Kenne Bell Boost-a-Pump - Chevy SSR Forum
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-21-2019, 03:16 PM Thread Starter
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Kenne Bell Boost-a-Pump

With the rebuilt engine and Magnuson 2300 supercharger, I now need a way to get more fuel moving. Rather than spend over $900 on a new performance fuel pump, does anyone have any experience with the Kenne Bell Boost-A-Pump?

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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-21-2019, 10:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Achias View Post
With the rebuilt engine and Magnuson 2300 supercharger, I now need a way to get more fuel moving. Rather than spend over $900 on a new performance fuel pump, does anyone have any experience with the Kenne Bell Boost-A-Pump?
The Boost-a-pump is the standard part for the 2005-2006 s/c installation. There is a difference, however between the two systems....... the 03-04 has the pressure regulator on the intake with a return line to the tank. The 05-06 has the regulator built into the pump assembly and is dead-headed at the fuel rail with no return line.

The 03-04 system gets an in-line boost pump that runs all the time. The 05-06 has a boost-a-plump that kicks the voltage up when boosted.

Your truck should already have the in-line pump and I am not certain that the boost-a-pump kicking the in-tank pump voltage up will do the whole job...... make sense????

Mike
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-22-2019, 08:32 AM
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I would not use a boost-a- pump, as I have seen them fail and not boost the fuel pressure like they should. Also they are hard on fuel pumps, running them over voltage to get the boost in fuel pressure.

I would rather have a proper designed fuel system for what I am doing, rather then have a band aid/patch together fuel system that can fail just when you need it most.

Do it right, or do it again after major failure of engine systems. You already have a new engine, so why take a chance on taking it out with a sub-par fuel system.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-22-2019, 10:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 06 Blue SSR View Post
I would not use a boost-a- pump, as I have seen them fail and not boost the fuel pressure like they should. Also they are hard on fuel pumps, running them over voltage to get the boost in fuel pressure.

I would rather have a proper designed fuel system for what I am doing, rather then have a band aid/patch together fuel system that can fail just when you need it most.

Do it right, or do it again after major failure of engine systems. You already have a new engine, so why take a chance on taking it out with a sub-par fuel system.
Can you steer me to a thread on Fanatics that talks about a failed boost-a-pump?

I searched, and can't find one so far. Everyone with an 05-06 SSR is using that system, and Magnuson offers a factory warranty on any supercharger installation they sell. I suspect the same boost-a-pump is used on any other LS installations.

Surely if the system was mickey mouse Magnuson would not be using it, and someone somewhere would have reported back on a failure.

I'd like to know what the alternative installation would be, because I'm re-installing a rebuilt and upgraded engine in my 06 right now.


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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-22-2019, 07:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flassh View Post
Can you steer me to a thread on Fanatics that talks about a failed boost-a-pump?

I searched, and can't find one so far. Everyone with an 05-06 SSR is using that system, and Magnuson offers a factory warranty on any supercharger installation they sell. I suspect the same boost-a-pump is used on any other LS installations.

Surely if the system was mickey mouse Magnuson would not be using it, and someone somewhere would have reported back on a failure.

I'd like to know what the alternative installation would be, because I'm re-installing a rebuilt and upgraded engine in my 06 right now.
There is not a thread on the failure of the boost-a-pump on the SSR site. I am talking from personal experience with them on several friends cars. There were several threads about them on LS1GTO about the failures people were having with them and how to fix it so the vehicle would run after the boost-a-pump fails.

The boost-a-pump is a band aid fix instead of a proper built fuel system. I would rather have a fuel pump that doesn't have to be over driven and will pump all the fuel the engine would ever need, as to a band aid setup.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-23-2019, 07:02 AM
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I had a fellow in a local speed shop do the install.
He is familiar with them, and says they stand up.
I did not do pressure checks and voltage checks after install.
But so far so good. I do not drive like I once did, with the pedal to the metal constantly. Only when I get the urge now.
Love my truck.... still grinning.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-23-2019, 10:48 AM Thread Starter
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This helps me a lot - the difference between the older and newer systems. THAT'S why my new 2300 did not come with the Magnavolt. I'm going to sleuth around Ilsa's underside today to try to figure out just what she has between the tank and the engine, but I'm not always successful in those types of endeavors. Where is the inline pump usually located?

I'm a little concerned that I've heard twice now from gearheads who say that the extra inline pump causes cavitation which is not good. What's your take on that Mike?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in AZ View Post
The Boost-a-pump is the standard part for the 2005-2006 s/c installation. There is a difference, however between the two systems....... the 03-04 has the pressure regulator on the intake with a return line to the tank. The 05-06 has the regulator built into the pump assembly and is dead-headed at the fuel rail with no return line.

The 03-04 system gets an in-line boost pump that runs all the time. The 05-06 has a boost-a-plump that kicks the voltage up when boosted.

Your truck should already have the in-line pump and I am not certain that the boost-a-pump kicking the in-tank pump voltage up will do the whole job...... make sense????

Mike

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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-23-2019, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
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Is there a regulator available that would turn the inline on when boost is detected?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in AZ View Post
The Boost-a-pump is the standard part for the 2005-2006 s/c installation. There is a difference, however between the two systems....... the 03-04 has the pressure regulator on the intake with a return line to the tank. The 05-06 has the regulator built into the pump assembly and is dead-headed at the fuel rail with no return line.

The 03-04 system gets an in-line boost pump that runs all the time. The 05-06 has a boost-a-plump that kicks the voltage up when boosted.

Your truck should already have the in-line pump and I am not certain that the boost-a-pump kicking the in-tank pump voltage up will do the whole job...... make sense????

Mike

My other vehicle is a
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-23-2019, 11:14 AM
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Just asking as an outsider to see if I understand what this Boost A Pump is doing. Is it just increasing the voltage to the fuel pump to speed it up to increase fuel volume or pressure? If so what is the voltage they are increasing it to?
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-23-2019, 10:13 PM
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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-23-2019, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Achias View Post
This helps me a lot - the difference between the older and newer systems. THAT'S why my new 2300 did not come with the Magnavolt. I'm going to sleuth around Ilsa's underside today to try to figure out just what she has between the tank and the engine, but I'm not always successful in those types of endeavors. Where is the inline pump usually located?

I'm a little concerned that I've heard twice now from gearheads who say that the extra inline pump causes cavitation which is not good. What's your take on that Mike?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achias View Post
Is there a regulator available that would turn the inline on when boost is detected?
Magnavolt pump voltage boosters are really problematic. Their reliability is poor and they usually burn up their electrical connector. In 2010, Magnuson switched from the Magnavolt to the Boost-a-pump. Reliability was significantly improved.

The Boost-a-pump increases the fuel pump voltage as boost increases. It has a linear relationship between boost and voltage. At all normal inlet vacuum levels, down to zero vacuum, the fuel pump voltage remains at 12 volts. It increases in voltage as the boost builds. probably one volt for every pound of boost. I believe that mine is about 18 volts at full boost of about 7 psi.

Your 03-04 in-line pump should be on the back side of the transmission crossmember, just forward of the fuel tank. It is in line with the fuel filter.

Regards,

Mike
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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-25-2019, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Stlhotrod View Post
Just asking as an outsider to see if I understand what this Boost A Pump is doing. Is it just increasing the voltage to the fuel pump to speed it up to increase fuel volume or pressure? If so what is the voltage they are increasing it to?
The boost-a-pump increases the voltage to the fuel pump to get it to pump more fuel and pressure. They normally go to 18 volts.

Like I have said before it is a band aid when compaired to a proper designed fuel system with a high performance fuel pump that will supply all the fuel the engine will need.
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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-25-2019, 12:09 PM
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Originally Posted by 06 Blue SSR View Post
The boost-a-pump increases the voltage to the fuel pump to get it to pump more fuel and pressure. They normally go to 18 volts.

Like I have said before it is a band aid when compaired to a proper designed fuel system with a high performance fuel pump that will supply all the fuel the engine will need.
Can you please share your definition of a properly designed fuel system for the 2005-2006 SSR in support of 700 horsepower? Would it be a dead-headed system with an in-tank regulator, or would you run an on-engine regulator with a return line to the tank? What brand and model fuel pump would you recommend?

Thanks,

Mike

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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-25-2019, 01:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 06 Blue SSR View Post
I would not use a boost-a- pump, as I have seen them fail and not boost the fuel pressure like they should. Also they are hard on fuel pumps, running them over voltage to get the boost in fuel pressure.

I would rather have a proper designed fuel system for what I am doing, rather then have a band aid/patch together fuel system that can fail just when you need it most.

Do it right, or do it again after major failure of engine systems. You already have a new engine, so why take a chance on taking it out with a sub-par fuel system.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 06 Blue SSR View Post
There is not a thread on the failure of the boost-a-pump on the SSR site. I am talking from personal experience with them on several friends cars. There were several threads about them on LS1GTO about the failures people were having with them and how to fix it so the vehicle would run after the boost-a-pump fails.

The boost-a-pump is a band aid fix instead of a proper built fuel system. I would rather have a fuel pump that doesn't have to be over driven and will pump all the fuel the engine would ever need, as to a band aid setup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 06 Blue SSR View Post
The boost-a-pump increases the voltage to the fuel pump to get it to pump more fuel and pressure. They normally go to 18 volts.

Like I have said before it is a band aid when compaired to a proper designed fuel system with a high performance fuel pump that will supply all the fuel the engine will need.
I asked you before if you could document situations where this specific system failed, and you couldn't.

Maybe someone somewhere had a failure with a Magnavolt, but you need to be able to document failures using the boost-a-pump system, and you can't. So far it's all innuendo.

At this stage, without being able to document failures with this specific system, you are treading on the reputations of some great people who have worked really hard to develop a good reputation for their product.

You are also doing a disservice to anyone who is seriously looking at purchasing a Magnuson supercharger.

Please provide documentation and costs of what you perceive to be a proper fuel system. Are you running a supercharged engine?

If you can't supply that, you are just a blowhard with fake news, and need to fade into the sunset. (Moderarted)

On another note, just to make sure my fuel system is operating properly, I purchased a fuel pressure gauge which records peak or warn pressure levels so I can monitor the system from inside the truck.

This is the Autometer gauge from Summit.

https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/atm-3671

This is the fitting for the fuel rail at the rear crossover to accept the 1/8 NPT sender. It's a swivel fitting so should allow for proper positioning of the sender.

https://www.summitracing.com/int/par...05-bl/reviews/


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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-25-2019, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike in AZ View Post
Can you please share your definition of a properly designed fuel system for the 2005-2006 SSR in support of 700 horsepower? Would it be a dead-headed system with an in-tank regulator, or would you run an on-engine regulator with a return line to the tank? What brand and model fuel pump would you recommend?

Thanks,

Mike
Mike, what I would use for 700+ HP would be a return system with the regulator at the engine. This type of fuel system does not need as much pressure as a return less system does. Normally it will be a reduction of app. 10 LB. I have seen return fuel systems support well over 1000 HP with room to grow.

As for a fuel pump, I like Deutche Works stuff, injectors and fuel pumps. There are other good ones out there that will do the job, but this is my personal favorite based on my research.
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post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-25-2019, 07:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flassh View Post
I asked you before if you could document situations where this specific system failed, and you couldn't.

Maybe someone somewhere had a failure with a Magnavolt, but you need to be able to document failures using the boost-a-pump system, and you can't. So far it's all innuendo.

At this stage, without being able to document failures with this specific system, you are treading on the reputations of some great people who have worked really hard to develop a good reputation for their product.

You are also doing a disservice to anyone who is seriously looking at purchasing a Magnuson supercharger.

Please provide documentation and costs of what you perceive to be a proper fuel system. Are you running a supercharged engine?

If you can't supply that, you are just a blowhard with fake news, and need to fade into the sunset. (Moderated)

On another note, just to make sure my fuel system is operating properly, I purchased a fuel pressure gauge which records peak or warn pressure levels so I can monitor the system from inside the truck.

This is the Autometer gauge from Summit.

https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/atm-3671

This is the fitting for the fuel rail at the rear crossover to accept the 1/8 NPT sender. It's a swivel fitting so should allow for proper positioning of the sender.

https://www.summitracing.com/int/par...05-bl/reviews/
Flash, I have said that the threads for the boost a pump systems and failures were on LS1GTO. Also I have friends that have had failures with this type of fuel system. Most have went with a fuel pump that will do the job without having to be over voltage to get the fuel pressure needed.

As far as Magnuson and their products, I have installed several of their superchargers with great success. But have always thought the boost a pump/magnavolt system to be a compromise to a proper fuel system. To me with what their kits cost, they could have done a better job with the fuel system then a gizmo that boost the voltage to the fuel pump to get the needed fuel pressure the system requires.

Now Kenny Bell products. Kenny Bell has been around for a long time working with V6 engines and have a great reputation with them. But their boost a pump gizmo is still a band aid type of mod to get the fuel pressure for a boosted engine. It is better then the magnavolt, but still a band aid.

No I don't run a force induction engine, but like I have said I have installed and worked on many of them. Also I am a ASE Master tech with over 40 years ex. Learning from one of the best for what to do when modding/hot rodding engines, my dad who set a few records back in the late 60's at the strip.

(Moderated)

The only smart thing you have posted is that you installed a fuel pressure gauge on your ride. That is a must when going forced induction. As fuel pressure is critical to keep the engine alive under boost. Along with timing. These two things can make or break your engine with FI.

As for a proper designed fuel system see the post below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 06 Blue SSR View Post
Mike, what I would use for 700+ HP would be a return system with the regulator at the engine. This type of fuel system does not need as much pressure as a return less system does. Normally it will be a reduction of app. 10 LB. I have seen return fuel systems support well over 1000 HP with room to grow.

As for a fuel pump, I like Deutche Works stuff, injectors and fuel pumps. There are other good ones out there that will do the job, but this is my personal favorite based on my research.
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post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-25-2019, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 06 Blue SSR View Post
Mike, what I would use for 700+ HP would be a return system with the regulator at the engine. This type of fuel system does not need as much pressure as a return less system does. Normally it will be a reduction of app. 10 LB. I have seen return fuel systems support well over 1000 HP with room to grow.

As for a fuel pump, I like Deutche Works stuff, injectors and fuel pumps. There are other good ones out there that will do the job, but this is my personal favorite based on my research.
Thanks for the input....

Mike

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post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-26-2019, 10:04 AM
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Found the supplier..........DeatschWerks

Looks like a wide range of pumps.

https://www.deatschwerks.com/home

Changing my fuel system is way above my pay grade. I'll run the boost-a-pump until it breaks down, if ever. I will at least be able to monitor fuel pressure with the new gauge, so should have a play by play of any developing issues. I have yet to hear of a boost-a-pump system failing, but some background on replacement systems would be a good thing.

I assume the stock system will allow for the actual pump and possibly filter to be replaced with higher quality aftermarket components, rather than installing a complete new factory pump assembly to repeat the cycle. I don't think I would want to bear the costs to have the system re-engineered to create a return system that wasn't there from the factory.

I am going to assume that a higher quality pump could handle the voltage increase at least as well as the OEM pump has so far.

These pumps are sure inexpensive compared to the in tank Carter pumps in the marine world.

They show a wide range of injectors and pumps for GM product, but no listing for the SSR, and no pump showing for the TBSS.


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post #19 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-02-2019, 10:00 AM Thread Starter
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Following my 2300 install and street tune, Ilsa always had a real problem with cold starts. She always took 3 or 4 tries to actually get the engine going. I thought it was a tune problem.

While setting up a tune at Speed Inc. in Schaumburg, IL, they said that an auxiliary fuel pump was needed in addition to the aftermarket Aeromotive pump that was intank. For an unknown reason, the dude who installed the 2300 did not install the included inline fuel pump. So I had the inline installed (just a bit more complicated than I thought I could handle) and now she starts on the first pull every time.

It's good that she starts correctly now, but it's bad that the Aeromotive intank pump didn't have the cohones to start the engine correctly. It was supposed to be able to handle up to 700hp and 20 lbs. of boost. It looks like another trip to the mech to figure out why the intank isn't performing well.

Any insight from those in the know?

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