TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - - Chevy SSR Forum
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post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 12:26 AM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - -

WIRING: For permanent applications, try not to rely on crimping to secure a wire connection. Crimping affords too much of a chance for corrosion and resistance to develop. Always solder the wire connector togrther. Here is a tip which will give you a clesn, neat and moisture resistant connection. Cut a one (1) inch long piece of appropriate sized shrink tubing and slip it over the wire. Move it far enough away from the connection so the heat does not make it react. Usually at least four (4) or five (5) inches away. After soldering, place the shrink tubing over the joint and, with a lighter or match, heat the tubing shrinking it over the joint. WSK - LAZY ONE

I am inserting the "Tips" from William Kennedy (aka LAZY ONE) from individual threads - trying to get the thread as one, rather than separated - Cash


MAGNETIZED SCREWDRIVER: In the past I've found it advantageous to have a magnetized screwdriver to hold a screw
while fastening. Here is a way you can magnetize one. Locate about 20 inches of 12 or 14 guage wire. Hold about five
(5) inches clear at one end and start wrapping the wire around the driver - 5 to 8 times leaving about five (5) inches clear
at the other end. Then touch one end to the negative post of the battery and MOMENTARILY touch the other end to the positive terminal. With todays solid state wiring, it would be best to disconnect the negative battery terminal. WSK - LAZY ONE

CONTROLLED FASTENING: When assembling things together where there are several fasteners, loosely fasten all units in place before tightening. This will allow the parts to shift, avoiding abuse to the part and/or fastener. WSK - LAZY ONE

BODY MOULDING: When fastening body moulding clips, try using 100% clear silcone on the fastener and the hole it goes into the body.
This helps eliminate rust formation and increases the holding of the related parts. It also plugs the hole in the body to stop road residue and water from rushing through. Keep in mind, this product can also act as a glue to help secure the parts. WSK

REASSEMBLY APPLICATIONS: When disconnecting or unfastening items on a vehicle, consider using one of the following upon reassembly:
DIELECTRIC GREASE, LOCKTITE, ANTI-SEIZE or just plain GREASE. Applying DIELECTRIC GREASE to a connection (Battery, Headlight or a
plug in connection) will make for better continuity by keeping corrosion away. If it is a part you don't want to loosen, consider using LOCKTITE, or PERMATEX COPPER THREADLOCKER - - of this, two choices are available - permanent and medium strength depending on the application. Should the part require movement or to keep the part from seizing up (stainless to stainless for example) use an ANTI-SEIZE COMPOUND. And, this suggestion is from MIKE in AZ, should you have a fastener exposed to heat, soak the parts in PHILLIPS MILK of MAGNESIA before assembly and later on the parts will come apart more easily. Absence of all of the above, just use grease to facilitate assembly and later on, future removal. Just remember, when refastening items consider applying one of the above. It will not only make your labor of love better now, but will make life more enjoyable later on. WSK

RUBBER HOSES: When fastening upper/lower radiator, heater or vacuum hoses, try applying a THIN film of grease to the hose and/or fitting prior to assembly. This will not only make assembly easier, but will help to prevent leakage. As an extra bonus, you'll be surprised at how much easier the parts will separate when needed. WSK

"DREMEL" LIKE ROTARY TOOL: This item is almost indispensable for anyone restoring or maintaining an older vehicle. Here are some suggestions worth considering; a) Any small scratch or polishing lines missed while polishing stainless trim may be easily cleaned up with polishing rouge and cloth wheels found in the rotary kit. b) When preparing cast iron heads, block or exhaust manifolds for finishing, try using a carbide cylindrical or tear drop cutter to remove excess flashing left when the part was made. The key here is CARBIDE. This item will not be in the rotary kit, but must be purchased separately (about $7.00 to $10.00). It is well worth the purchase price as it will remain sharp and is aggressive. c) A small cylindrical (1/16" or 1/8") carbide cutter is extremely helpful removing nuts or bolts. Occasionally, there may be a specific nut or bolt you wish to save because of it's unusual characteristics well, this tool can remove the unwanted part and save the other. d) Most kits have fiberglass reinforced cutting discs. These are tremendously useful cutting nuts or bolts free. Use only the FIBERGLASS REINFORCED discs for safety!! WSK

EXHAUST MANIFOLD STUDS: If you have studs at the outlet end of the exhaust manifold, consider replacing the stock studs with equal size STAINLESS STEEL. Then, use extra thick BRASS nuts. With the high heat concentration and exposure to road debris, the original nuts and studs are prone to deterioratioin and rusting together. The BRASS and STAINLESS combination will ensure removal when required. The
extra thick BRASS nuts may be found at most auto parts stores. They come in kits with steel screws, so don't use these screws, only STAINLESS screws!! WSK

A STAKED ASSEMBLY: Have you ever taken something apart to refurbish when it was originally staked or peened for permanency? If so,
and then on reassembly you find it cannot be reassembled due to the staking not being there because you removed it when you took it apart?
Depending on the part, and, as long as there is no stress on the part, try using GORILLA GLUE to secure the parts. (Don't get it on your hands - it stains black and will last about three (3) days). It dries clear on the part. Any extra unwanted residue may be removed with a razor blade or x-acto knife. Several years ago this was used on a Fiero L/R mirror adjustment switch with success. WSK

THREADED INSERTS: This item is for use on metal or plastic parts where the thickness doesn't allow for proper threading to hold an item
together securely. Consider using a product called QUIK THREADS by Fastener Products in Wauconda, Illinois. This item is inserted into
a predrilled hole and, using a hand tool, expand the insert behind the material similar to a MOLLY anchor. The difference is the threaded
insert offers various sizes of machine screw threads to suit the fastening need. Here is a little tip: If a hole is too large for the size of
anchor needed, OR, if the plastic material is too thin and not strong enough for the insert you might consider an appropriately sized washer on one or, both sides of the insert to give the material added strength. Both METRIC and SAE sizes are available. WSK - LAZY ONE
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post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 08:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William Kennedy View Post
WIRING: For permanent applications, try not to rely on crimping to secure a wire connection. Crimping affords too much of a chance for corrosion and resistance to develop. Always solder the wire connector togrther. Here is a tip which will give you a clesn, neat and moisture resistant connection. Cut a one (1) inch long piece of appropriate sized shrink tubing and slip it over the wire. Move it far enough away from the connection so the heat does not make it react. Usually at least four (4) or five (5) inches away. After soldering, place the shrink tubing over the joint and, with a lighter or match, heat the tubing shrinking it over the joint. WSK - LAZY ONE
Great tip, though I don't like an open flame when doing automotive wiring! Best to buy or borrow a heat gun.
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post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 08:39 AM
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My 2 cents

As another safe heat source........ you can always use the soldering iron to shrink the tubing. Donít try to use the tip of the iron. Instead, use the root of the tip, where it is closest to the element. Be patient and rotate the wire so that you shrink the entire circumference of the tubing.....

Regards,

Mike

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post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 09:12 AM
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Some of us are just plain lousy at soldering small gauge wiring effectively. I'm not good at it trying it with items needing soldering on my work bench.......translate to needing to make some wiring repairs with your feet up over the front seat and your head/neck up under the dash and it's virtually impossible.

Having has to work upside down under the dash on my streetrod a few years ago due to a serious wiring problem and replace sections of corroded wires..........I found these types of connectors to provide excellent/strong connections. While you could in fact add a section of shrink tubing over the connector, not really necessary in most cases and no soldering required.

Someone will have to add to my post to identify the brand name as I cannot recall it nor can I find the same deal on the web via google. I have several different sizes/types, but have them sorted into a plastic box and no longer have the brand name handy. Someone on this site put me onto these last year.............I really like 'em.

The ones on the far left and far right are "taps" (different sizes) while the center ones both front and rear are connectors (different sizes).
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post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 10:16 AM
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My SSR:
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I like the tinned copper crimp connectors.
Crimp the wires then solder solid and cover with shrink tube, shrink tape, or even liquid cover.
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Often wrong...... but never in doubt.
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post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 11:37 AM
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William - keep posting your ideas here as a post - just add to the thread

If I see your ideas I will copy them into Post 1 to keep them in one spot, but just post as normal - in this thread only
We have been discussing how best to approach this so best not to create a new thread for every idea that comes to mind

Also, other guys that think they wish to grace us with a "Tip" - post it here - I don't think William will mind
Like I need more on my plate, but I will try to assemble them


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post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 03:03 PM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - -

FASTENING PHILLIPS ( or other appropriate screws) HEAD SCREWS: Have you ever tried to fasten a Phillips head screw in a limited amount of space? A space where your needle nose fingers won't fit? Try applying grease to the tip of the screwdriver then stick the screw to the driver and drive it home. After securing, wipe any excess grease from the head of the screw and driver. WSK - LAZY ONE
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post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 04:04 PM
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My SSR:
'06- Silver/Copper- 121421
Use tape or a rubber band to hold a paperclip on each side of the screwdriver so the paperclips will hold the screwhead.
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post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 04:42 PM
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I have a little "gizmo" in my tool chest. It has a hole in the middle. You insert a screwdriver tip in to the hole and stroke it back/forth a few times......bingo.........it's magnetized. Now it will cling to a screw.

Sometimes you don't want that effect. Being magnetized as a screwdriver can sometimes be a pain versus a help.

The outer side of my "gizmo", you stroke the screwdriver blade a couple of times on it........bingo.........the screwdriver is NO longer magnetized.
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post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-26-2018, 10:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xoxoxoBruce View Post
I like the tinned copper crimp connectors.
Crimp the wires then solder solid and cover with shrink tube, shrink tape, or even liquid cover.
Yes, what Bruce says - these work great and never a problem.
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post #11 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-28-2018, 12:05 PM
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I have merged the two threads, Please add new items to this thread so we only have one place to look for these good ideas.


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post #12 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 08:06 AM
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In regards to soldering vs. crimping, you're going to get as many diverse opinions on that as you do with oil and filter choices. I'm kinda split either way, but I'm leaning more towards crimping these days. Get the right tool and it's amazing how easy it is. You'll need several different tools though, which is the primary disadvantage (cost).

I like the ratcheting style crimpers. Ideal's "Crimp Master" is one of the more popular out there and the dies are replaceable, so you can buy one handle and multiple dies to do different types of crimps.
TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - --idealcrimpmaster.jpg TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - --ideal-crimp-die.jpg

I recently did some harness repairs for my El Camino. That uses the older series 56 crimp terminals. The Crimpmaster did an excellent job of both crimping to the wire and to the insulation at the same time. Looks just like a factory crimp.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Topspin View Post
Great tip, though I don't like an open flame when doing automotive wiring! Best to buy or borrow a heat gun.
I've always had "issues" trying to use flame to shrink the tubing uniformly... usually something burns. I recently picked this up and I'm glad I did! It really works! It's $12 from Amazon, and being small, will easily fit in a tool box.
TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - --mini-heat-gun.jpg


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post #13 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 04:19 PM Thread Starter
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ssr71 - Forgive my ignorance, but what is it? If you think it is good, I might also want one. WSK - LAZY ONE
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post #14 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 04:30 PM Thread Starter
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moscotter - When you have to do wiring under the dash you must put the vehicle on a rotisserie. Then it will be easier. WSK - LAZY ONE
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post #15 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William Kennedy View Post
ssr71 - Forgive my ignorance, but what is it? If you think it is good, I might also want one. WSK - LAZY ONE
Mini heat gun:




My only gripe is that the power cord is way too short (1M).


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post #16 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 05:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moscooter View Post
Someone will have to add to my post to identify the brand name as I cannot recall it nor can I find the same deal on the web via google. I have several different sizes/types, but have them sorted into a plastic box and no longer have the brand name handy. Someone on this site put me onto these last year.............I really like 'em.
Posi-Lock!
https://www.posi-products.com/


Took a bit of mind searching to remember even part of the name. I've got some of those too.


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post #17 of 38 (permalink) Old 08-30-2018, 10:46 PM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - -

CROSS THREADING AVOIDANCE: When reinserting a screw into plastic or soft material, avoid cross threading by taking the screw by hand
and while inserting it into the hole, back it up (counter-clockwise) until you feel the threads connect. This will be when you feel a "bump" through the screw. You may then be successful turning the screw in (clockwise) without cross threading. WSK - LAZY ONE
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post #18 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-03-2018, 12:21 AM Thread Starter
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My SSR:
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - CHASSIS PAINT: CHASSIS SAVER is a rust preventive paint available in gloss or satin black. Some say it compares
to POR-15 but, is more reasonably priced. It may be applied with a spray gun but, I've had great results with a foam brush (no streaks). When
applying, it's imperative that one wears gloves as, if not immediately washed off with lacquer thinner, it will be with you for three (3) to five (5) days.
Any metal exposed to the elements should have this applied. First, wire brush, scrape or use an SOS pad to clean the part of excess rust. Second,
if possible, spray coat the item with "OSPHO by SKYBRYTE CO. of Cleveland, Ohio and leave set overnight and then in the morning wipe the item
down with a damp rag. Third, apply the CHASSIS SAVER paint and leave dry overnight. This is available at most of your automotive paint stores.
Ebay is a good source and will run about $40.00 a quart. Unless you are going to do a lot of painting a quart should do just fine. Works very well
on any outside furniture - wood - metal or plastic. The application of "OSPHO" is not a must but, does help in getting the job done with success.
WSK - LAZY ONE
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post #19 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-03-2018, 11:56 PM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - PARTS CLEANING: When cleaning parts requireing special handling prior to assembly such as, when
applying a thread locking compound, some may use brake cleaner which works well. If you are cleaning the parts with lacquer thinner
take and wipe the part with alcohol afterwards. This will remove a slight residue left from the lacquer thinner which will hinder good
adhesion. WSK - LAZY ONE
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post #20 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-04-2018, 11:00 PM Thread Starter
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TRICK and TIPS for FYI - - HOSE CLAMPS: When using stainless band type hose clamps, be aware that all clamps are not equal. Most clamps
purchased at local auto parts stores offer these clamps with a stainless band, but with a steel screw that; over time, will rust and be difficult to
remove. Consider going to a hardware store like HOME DEPOT. Locate the plumbing department and you will find the size you need with both
band and screw in stainless. (This item is being repeated so it can be located here) LAZY ONE
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post #21 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-06-2018, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - VALVE SPRING PRESSURE TESTER: When the need to test springs for correct pressure and nothing professional is
around try using a bathroom scale (a word of advice here, don't tell your wife and make sure it is clean when finished) and a drill press. Place the
scale under the drill press. Set the stop on the press for the height to be measured and depress the spring with the spindle of the press to the
stop and read off the pounds measured on the scale. All springs should be within specifications and within 10% of each other. LAZY ONE
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post #22 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-06-2018, 10:36 PM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - NUTS AND BOLTS: For a long lasting and clean appearance of your fasteners on your vehicle try replacing them with
the identical item in STAINLESS STEEL. Most can be found at your local ACE HARDWARE store. As an extra bonus, the stainless may be polished
for a finish that will closely resemble polished chrome. By doing this, it will help eliminate constant cleaning and provide a rust free (grade 300)
or rust resistant (grade 400) part. This suggestion should only be used for those parts not requiring high tensile strength. If the high tensile
strength is needed the place to address is ARP (Automotive Racing Products) in California. More than likely, they will have the part you need in
grade 8 or better in stainless. LAZY ONE (This article is reprinted for inclusion in this forum)
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post #23 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-07-2018, 02:55 PM
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One thing I dislike about working on cars is getting gas on my hands. The smell lingers forever (and I get headaches from it too). Getting that smell off can be tough, but I've found one method that appears to work reasonably well (not 100%, but really good). I mix a bit of liquid soap (Dawn works best for me) with baking soda, then thoroughly wash the hands with that mixture. Sometimes I might need a second application, but usually once is enough to cut the smell to a tolerable level.


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post #24 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-07-2018, 11:13 PM Thread Starter
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That's a good idea SSR71. I'll have to try it. My wife always has some in the refrigerator. At times she complains about indigestion and I'll
tell her to mix a teaspoon of baking soda and six (6) ozs. of water and drink it. Tastes terrible but works instantly to relieve indigestion. LAZY ONE
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post #25 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-07-2018, 11:23 PM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS: Use DIELECTRIC GREASE when making these connections. This will provide a good
contact that will be corrosion resistant and allow removal with less chance of breakage. Use it on spark plug boots, battery terminals, head-
light sockets and all sort of plug-in connections. It will be especially helpful along salt water areas. LAZY ONE
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post #26 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-11-2018, 11:56 PM Thread Starter
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TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - TUBLESS TIRE RIM LEAK: If there is no apparent reason . . . nails, glass, screws, etc. for air leakage from a tire;
then usually it's either a valve stem or rim leak. To satisfy a rim leak, break the tire down and use Bead Sealer by BALKAMP available at NAPA
Auto Parts Stores under part number 710-1204. Apply this sealant to both the tire and rim. If the rim is in good shape; that is, without rust
or bends a good seal can be expected. (this is rewritten for inclusion in this forum) LAZY ONE
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post #27 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-12-2018, 11:53 AM Thread Starter
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ssr71 - WOW! Your suggestion about using the MINI heat gun to shrink tubing was so good i purchased one and just received it today. It is
huge! From the picture it looks to be about 4" to 5" long. The item received; while looking just like yours especially to color, is 9" long. Is
it possible I bought a larger one? I guess it doesn't matter as long as it works - and, it does. Thanks for your suggestion. LAZY ONE
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post #28 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-12-2018, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAZY ONE View Post
ssr71 - WOW! Your suggestion about using the MINI heat gun to shrink tubing was so good i purchased one and just received it today. It is
huge! From the picture it looks to be about 4" to 5" long. The item received; while looking just like yours especially to color, is 9" long. Is
it possible I bought a larger one? I guess it doesn't matter as long as it works - and, it does. Thanks for your suggestion. LAZY ONE
No, that's the right one. But it's a lot more convenient to have this "flashlight" sized object on the table (it has it's own stand) than a big heat gun. It will store nicely in a toolbox (unlike a big heat gun), and being not quite as powerful, there's less risk of actually melting stuff to ruin.


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post #29 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-12-2018, 11:18 PM Thread Starter
SSR Pit Crew
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Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Roselle, Illinois This is located NW of Chicago about 25 miles.
Posts: 220


My SSR:
2006 Black with running boards and chrome package. Have added items from Florida and Texas.
TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - STAINLESS STEEL HARDWARE: Be careful when using stainless steel bolt and nut together. Should you over
tighten these items they will have a tendency to gall against each other and weld themselves together. Here are some ways of preventing
this from happening: a) use a stainless bolt with a steel nut or, vis-a-vis. b) if you must use both together, use anti-seize on the parts
prior to assembly. c) should you not have anti-seize available, use MAYLOX. You may find it's more reasonable, readily available and work
as well. If, on the other hand, you wish to assemble something and not want it to come apart . . . While on the subject of things seizing up;
anytime you assemble an aluminum part into or onto steel or cast iron (such as an aluminum distributer into a cast iron block), always
use an anti-seize on the parts. This also goes for pot metal parts as well. Many of you know what corrosion is especially if you live near
salt water or the midwest. LAZY ONE
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post #30 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-13-2018, 11:51 PM Thread Starter
SSR Pit Crew
Lifetime Supporting Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Roselle, Illinois This is located NW of Chicago about 25 miles.
Posts: 220


My SSR:
2006 Black with running boards and chrome package. Have added items from Florida and Texas.
TRICKS and TIPS for FYI - - CHEMICAL SPILLS: Keep a bag of KITTY LITTER around your workshop for those gasoline, antifreeze or oil spills
that may happen from time to time. It will contain the spill making cleanup easier. Afterwards, you can spread more around the spilled area
and work your foot into it with a twisting motion and you will be surprised at how nice it will make your floor look. LAZY ONE
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