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Discussion Starter #21
I had asked a question on Amazon about the recovery time on the tpms unit if the vehicle is garaged for days at a time but haven't received any responses.

Dave
After I adjusted my tire pressure I had to get over 25mph and about 3-5 minutes.
I don't believe that these numbers are in the manual, but I do know the sensors go to sleep to save battery life, just like newer cars. I would also look for one with live data instead of a slower refresh rate.
 

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Just purchased the Honeywell Guardinator TPMS sensor system - while trying to install, it asks for vehicle information - one particular questions is the vehicle lateral displacement - anyone have a clue as to what this is and in particular what is the lateral displacement for the SSR? - cannot seem to continue the installation until I put something in this box. Instructions are not much help nor is the Guardinator program that I downloaded from Google Aps. Any help would be greatly appreciated
Don
:(
If I were you, I would try to send that set back and get one of the many others available. I also tried to google your brand and did see one totally negative review. As mentioned, lateral displacement is a very odd factor to be used whatsoever for a tire pressure sensor device. Now, I noted that the unit you bought is also supposed to scan engine data, etc. so that likely is the reason it is asking for that (extremely odd) factor.

If all you are after is a remote tire pressure sensor system, again..........I'd go after one like is being previously mentioned in this post...........I just ordered mine a few hours ago.
 

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Thanks guys for the input, believe you are correct moscooter - going to send this one back - might know that the one I select out of those available would be the most complicated and after reading the directions for the fourth time, it would appear as though I need the computer OBD in addition to the TPMS - and here I specifically picked this one as it showed four caps and smart phone program with a 10 minute installation - so much for that bull.....
 

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Installed the Jansite TPMS purchased through Amazon today. What's the best tire pressure to set for the tires? I changed them from 28# to 35#.
 

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I have no idea why they would call for "vehicle" lateral displacement. Try putting in 12.

Just my guess.

Dave
:rolleyes:

Dave,

I gotta kinda "tug on your chain" given you chimed in on this posting. We have covered this ground before, but it sticks in my mind, that on prior posts going a year or two back that you talked in terms of "BAR" versus "PSI".

That at the time, blew my mind as being a car/truck enthusiast for my whole life........now in my 70's. I had never EVER heard anyone reference their tire pressure in those terms.:oops:

Meantime, you made it clear that there was indeed such a term. When I saw this posting and damned if some of the displays on Amazon indeed showed "BAR" on the display of the sensor........I thought maybe old Dave knows something that most of us didn't know and/or care to know.:giggle:
 

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Autoprof, it is against the law for a tire store to plug a radial tire. The reason is that air can leak between the plies and cause a blowout. Surely not worth the risk of serious injury or death. Get it properly repaired with an internal patch an throw the plugs away.
 

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Autoprof, it is against the law for a tire store to plug a radial tire. The reason is that air can leak between the plies and cause a blowout. Surely not worth the risk of serious injury or death. Get it properly repaired with an internal patch an throw the plugs away.

:rolleyes:

Not sure it is in fact (against the law), but for sure most all retailer will NOT plug a tire anymore due to liability concerns. Certainly never should be done on sidewall punctures but within the tread area, a good plug job can often work well.

Is plugging a tire a permanent fix?
If it was in the middle of the treads you should have no problems after the proper repair. A simple plug from the outside is a “temporary” repair only. Done correctly, in the center of the tread, with a simple nail puncture, a plug will last the life of the tire.Jul 4, 2016
 

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:rolleyes:

An additional note as to "Plugging" tires. Note in the above comments that I (copy/pasted), it says a simple plug from the outside is a "temporary" repair only. There are indeed (plugs) that can be and are used that are inserted from within a dismounted tire.

A simple nail puncture in the center of the tread as mentioned using this kind of plug should last the life of the tire.

Here are more thoughts on the topic.......

Fixing Flat Tires - TIRE PLUG vs RADIAL PATCH
January 30th, 2013

We have several people that visit Texas Tire Sales asking us to "plug" a hole in their tire. We patch tires at Texas Tire Sales but we do not "plug" tires at either of our Tire shops. I have never plugged a tire on any of my personal vehicles. I personally don't feel that it is the safest or most effective procedure for repairing a leaking or damaged tire.
Yes, plugging a tire is cheaper than patching by about 5 or 6 dollars and that is likely the main reason many people request plugs. The old adage, "You get what you pay for" may speak volumes in this particular comparison of plugs vs patches as plugging a tire may not be less expensive in the long haul. I do know that we deal with the end result of a failed tire plug on almost a daily basis - it usually involves a tow truck, a destroyed tire and sometimes a ruined rim.
What is a Tire Plug.
A tire plug is a sticky, expandable object that gets stuffed in a hole in the tire from the outside and is wedged in until the air stops leaking out. The plug should easily stay intact well enough to re-inflate the tire and get safely to a repair shop. Of course, there are people who swear by the plug and have told me in no uncertain terms "that plug will outlast my wife". I typically don't argue with these folks or question their relationship with their wife nor do I see any benefit in telling them that their confidence and experience with tire plugs contradicts what we see every day in our repair shops. We simply let them know that we are tire professionals and will not do a substandard repair when there is a better option.
In all honesty, people bring us their tires when something has gone wrong. They don't stop by the store to show us how well their tires are wearing or to show us that they don't have a flat. Therefore, I have no statistical data that confirms my opinion on tire plug success or failure.
Having been in the tire business for over 20 years, I do know a few things about the properties of tires, though. Speed causes friction. Friction causes heat. Heat causes expansion. Tires expand as they heat up. A tire plug made of a different compound than the tire rubber expands at a different rate than the tire. You will have to rely on your stuffing skills to be sure you stuffed the plug in the hole properly and with enough sticky material that the plug will continue to hold when the tire heats up and expands under increased heat caused by increased speed/friction.
Speed means you are going fast, which means you are taking a chance on a failure while at that higher rate of speed. This is where the above described tire/wheel/vehicle damage comes in. As a tire cools off, it contracts. Now you get to hope that the tire is contracting at a greater rate than the plug material so you are not left with a leak and subsequently sitting roadside waiting for a tow truck.
I wish I had a nickel for all of the times I've seen a plug sticking through the inside of a tire with a hole right next to it. The plug installer was apparently unable to insert the plug in the exact path of the object that originally punctured the tire, so he punctured the tire again and made different hole as he rammed the plug through the tire tread.
Plugging a tire can trap air between the layers of tread. When the plug is dipped into the glue and inserted into the hole, the plug glues itself to every layer it passes through. As the tire heats up, the air between the layers begins to heat up and expand. The air has no place to go, so as it expands, it causes the tread to separate from the rest of the tire. If the tire was patched, the patch prevents any air from inside the tire from escaping, but allows any air trapped between the layers to escape out of the entrance hole in the outer tread area.
The same thing happens when the plug is not inserted exactly into the path the puncture occurred in. The air inside the tire tries to exit using the hole that was missed. As the air moves towards the outside of the tread, it becomes blocked by the plug that was inserted into the outer hole. Again, the air is between the layers of the tire, it gets hot, expands and causes a tread separation.
What is a radial patch?
The fact is, we now have a better option to plugging tires and it's called a radial patch. As I stated above, my professional "tire guy" opinion and experience dictates that any tire repair done without removing the tire from the wheel is improper. Without inspecting the inside of the tire for hidden damage comes the risk of returning a weakened tire to service. That is not to say that in some cases a plug wouldn't serve as a temporary low speed solution. For example, If a tire is punctured while off-road in the middle of nowhere and a spare tire isn't available, you might use a plug but, that plug should be replaced with a radial tire patch as soon as possible.
Radial patches are specifically designed to repair radial tires which comprises most of the tires on the road today. Radial patches are self-vulcanizing. That is to say after they heat up from driving, they "melt" into the tire and become one piece. Patching a tire with a radial patch can take about 20 to 30 minutes while installing a plug takes only a few minutes and usually can be done while the tire is still on the car.
Don't just take our word for it.
The Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA),
the national trade association for tire manufacturers that make tires in the U.S. refers to a tire industry study which showed that nearly 88 percent of tire repairs are performed improperly. They also suggest that any tire repair done without removing the tire to inspect and determine the extent of the damage is an improper repair and could pose a safety hazard and could also affect the manufacturer's warranty. The RMA also offers Tire Dealers and auto repair shops detailed wall charts which show , in detail a proper tire repair. Here is a list of criteria to perform a proper tire repair according to the RMA:
  • Repairs are limited to the tread area only.
  • Puncture injury cannot be greater than 1/4 inch (6mm) in diameter.
  • Repairs must be performed by removing the tire from the wheel in order to perform a complete inspection to assess all damage that may be present.
  • Repairs may NOT overlap.
  • A rubber stem or plug, must be applied to fill the puncture injury and a patch must be applied to seal the inner liner. A common repair unit is a one-piece unit with a stem and a patch portion. A Plug by itself is an unacceptable tire repair.
At Texas Tire Sales, we charge $10.00 to patch tire in the fashion approved by the RMA. If you insist on having your tire plugged in order to save a few bucks, we will be unable to assist you.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Autoprof, it is against the law for a tire store to plug a radial tire. The reason is that air can leak between the plies and cause a blowout. Surely not worth the risk of serious injury or death. Get it properly repaired with an internal patch an throw the plugs away.
Not sure where you live this might be illegal but in Ohio it is not illegal and I seriously doubt it is were you live either. It is also not illegal to install tires that have a lower speed rating then OEM in the United States. However I hear stories all the time of tire salesman saying that same thing. I always tell people it's not illegal but I wouldn't sell them or recommend it because the car was purchased for its ride and handling characteristics and changing to a lower speed rated tire will alter that to the point of dissatisfaction. I have heard that lower speed rating sales is illegal in Europe.
I know our local police do not repair tires period, because of the initial damage and its effects on saftey and how it might effect the speed rating of the tire. Which by the way different tire companies say different things in regards to repairs and speed rated tire warranties.

I have and do patch plugs at my school.i have also attended tire repair training sessions from tire tech, a leading tire equipment manufacturer. I realize plugs can be a problem but I don't plan to remove the plug and install a patch plug. The only thing I plan to do is drive my SSR. One of the main reasons for dismounting tire is to inspect for damage, I know there was no damage because the size of nail was small and MOST importantly the tire pressure did not drop below a safe pressure where damage might have occurred which was the MAIN point of my thread.
THANKS TO MY TPMS system my tire was repairable no matter if you repair it or just keep putting air in it until you get it repaired. Running low on pressure will damage a tire beyond repair! When I ran a service station my customers would say "just plug it, I never ran it low on pressure!" I still dismounted the tire for inspection but I never said it was illegal.
 

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Just got the Jansite TPMS in the mail today. Gotta say, the instructions leave a little to be desired. I think I can figure it out by watching youtube videos.
 

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Here is the one I got.: TPMS

I don't think it is better than the other ones that look like they are all made on the same assembly line but it works. It is solar powered with a plugin option and will hold a charge for several weeks in the garage.
:rolleyes:

Mine just arrived in the mail today. Looks just like the one you got only not sure it was labled the same. I installed the sensors and swapped out the C to an F for temperature and also went to PSI on the pressure. I have it double backed taped to my console tunnel just ahead of the shifter boot.

Not sure it will get enough sunlight there to keep it charged, but will have to wait and see. Smokey is not going anywhere as we await the damn hurricane that will arrive here tomorrow..........all day long.

Did not see in instructions about the unit turning itself off??? Do I have to switch it on every time I go somewhere and then be sure to switch it off when stopped.
 

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Did not see in instructions about the unit turning itself off??? Do I have to switch it on every time I go somewhere and then be sure to switch it off when stopped.
I don't turn it off. I had it indoors for 2 weeks without it having a problem.

Good luck with that hurricane.
 
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