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I grabbed one of the old shocks from the trash and checked it looks like they are KYB shocks.
The KYB shocks will cause the front end to sit over 1/2” higher than the OEM shocks. This is because the KYB shocks have the lower spring perch (welded on) in the wrong location. They are correct ride height for the Trailblazer, but definitely not correct for the SSR.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
I had time tonight so I got around to doing the rear lowing. All in all it took about 2 hours total from getting the jack and tools out till the last tool was put away. I ended up grabbing way more tools than I needed so here is the list of required tools. Sockets 18 MM for the shock bolts, 19 MM for the lug nuts. Large flat bladed screw driver for the bump stops, plastic pry tool for the hub cap and torque wrench for setting the torque on the shock and lug nuts.

Pretty straight forward. Remove center caps, Loosen the lug nuts. Jack up truck and set jack stands under frame so the rear end can hang down free. I kept the jack under the center of the rear end while I pulled the tires. Next remove both shocks 18 MM socket with a ratchet on the upper and a 18 MM wrench and socket for the lowers. Lower the jack and the rear end will be hanging with no tension on the springs.

(Bump Stops) Next take the large screw driver and pry out the bump stops. They are only held in place by taps around the cup they are mounted in. I sprayed the new ones with a little lube to get them to slide in easier. I pushed the new one in at the front and then worked the rear of them in with the flat bladed screw driver. I have one that is kind of blunt on the tip and I used that so as not to damage the bump stop. My old bump stops were shot.

(Springs) Push down on one side of the rear end and then push the spring toward the rear of the truck and the spring will pop out. Go the the other side and repeat. I then put the springs in place and then moved the jack under the lower spring mount.

(Shocks) The new shocks are held with a wrap around them holding them under pressure. I hung the shock by the upper mount and snugged the upper bolt. I then moved the shock into position toward the lower mount and pulled the band off the shock. As it expanded out I aimed it right into position of the lower mount. It rested on the jack cup and I slide the bolt in the mount. I snugged it up and then repeated for the other side. You have to make sure you have the upper spring centered in its seat but it is very easy to do as you raise the jack push it so it centers. I then torqued all the shocks bolts to 63 foot pounds.

Put the wheels on. Snugged the lugs and raised the truck, pulled the jack stands and lowered the truck on the ground. Last thing was to torque the lugs and put on the center caps. I will post up some pictures later. The old springs on my truck were KYB.
 

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:rolleyes:

Very thorough explanation of how you proceeded. All I would add is to say that it would be helpful to readers (next time) if you would break it all down into paragraphs.;)
 

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I had time tonight so I got around to doing the rear lowing. All in all it took about 2 hours total from getting the jack and tools out till the last tool was put away. I ended up grabbing way more tools than I needed so here is the list of required tools. Sockets 18 MM for the shock bolts, 19 MM for the lug nuts. Large flat bladed screw driver for the bump stops, plastic pry tool for the hub cap and torque wrench for setting the torque on the shock and lug nuts.

Pretty straight forward. Remove center caps, Loosen the lug nuts. Jack up truck and set jack stands under frame so the rear end can hang down free. I kept the jack under the center of the rear end while I pulled the tires. Next remove both shocks 18 MM socket with a ratchet on the upper and a 18 MM wrench and socket for the lowers. Lower the jack and the rear end will be hanging with no tension on the springs.

(Bump Stops) Next take the large screw driver and pry out the bump stops. They are only held in place by taps around the cup they are mounted in. I sprayed the new ones with a little lube to get them to slide in easier. I pushed the new one in at the front and then worked the rear of them in with the flat bladed screw driver. I have one that is kind of blunt on the tip and I used that so as not to damage the bump stop. My old bump stops were shot.

(Springs) Push down on one side of the rear end and then push the spring toward the rear of the truck and the spring will pop out. Go the the other side and repeat. I then put the springs in place and then moved the jack under the lower spring mount.

(Shocks) The new shocks are held with a wrap around them holding them under pressure. I hung the shock by the upper mount and snugged the upper bolt. I then moved the shock into position toward the lower mount and pulled the band off the shock. As it expanded out I aimed it right into position of the lower mount. It rested on the jack cup and I slide the bolt in the mount. I snugged it up and then repeated for the other side. You have to make sure you have the upper spring centered in its seat but it is very easy to do as you raise the jack push it so it centers. I then torqued all the shocks bolts to 63 foot pounds.

Put the wheels on. Snugged the lugs and raised the truck, pulled the jack stands and lowered the truck on the ground. Last thing was to torque the lugs and put on the center caps. I will post up some pictures later. The old springs on my truck were KYB.
Nice write up. The only thing that I would do different is to drive it 30/40 miles, then re-torque the lug nuts, then install the caps.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Nice write up. The only thing that I would do different is to drive it 30/40 miles, then re-torque the lug nuts, then install the caps.
Very good point. With the weather around me it will probably be sitting and I may get to swap the fronts before I get any real chance to drive it. But yes always a good idea to check the torque. I will probably also hit the shock bolts as well to check them also.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Since all four corners - springs and shocks - were replaced, would an front-end alignment check be appropriate as well?
It wouldn't hurt and for the money it is probably worth it for cheap insurance. The shocks are not going to change any of the alignment adjustment points so it shouldn't have any effect on it. The place I got mone done when I first rebuilt the front end gave me a full print out and I can take it in to have it checked for no additional charge so I will probably do it to see if there is any difference in the before and after settings.
 

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It wouldn't hurt and for the money it is probably worth it for cheap insurance. The shocks are not going to change any of the alignment adjustment points so it shouldn't have any effect on it. The place I got mone done when I first rebuilt the front end gave me a full print out and I can take it in to have it checked for no additional charge so I will probably do it to see if there is any difference in the before and after settings.
Understood... just thought it would be interesting to see if the alignment was affected to any degree.
 
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