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OK, Ilsa has had a lot of engine upgrade work lately including a 2300 supercharger, headers, forged internals, tunes, etc. I am now finding that after a trip (maybe an hour or so of steady running), the next time I start it, I get a LOT of oil smoke from the pipes. Not a pretty thing to see in our neighborhood. This only happens after a (kinda) long or longer trip. After running for a minute or so, the smoke stops. I checked the book to see if it might be a PCV valve problem, and it looks like these engines don't have PCV valves anymore.

May I please have a short education about what system now handles crankcase ventilation, and what might be happening with all of that smoke?
 

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Pull the air breather tube off the throttle body and check to see if you see oil inside the throttle body area.
I had a similar (yet more mild) on my previous SSR; fine while driving but the accumulated oil after being parked would send an pretty good buff of smoke at the next startup.
It has been several years ago on my previous R with the Maggie so I don't remember the exact routing correction but there was an issue with the blower vacuum line routing where it returns into the intake at the throttle body.
I have also seen inline oil catch can applications, but first see if you have oil being sucked into the intake.
 

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Does this oil smoke appear after the truck sits for a period of time after a trip, e.g., after being allowed to cool down, or while the truck is still hot? If the former, that is typical of oil leakage past the valve seals that seeps into the cylinders after shutdown and would appear as a puff of smoke at the next startup as that oil in the cylinders burns off. I suggest you check the condition of your plugs to determine the extent of the issue and see if they are oil-fouled.
 

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I agree with the above posts, check to see if you got oil in the pcv tube to the supercharger. I’d also be monitoring your oil level until you get it sorted out.

I had a similar problem when I ran Holley covers with the TVS1900. At freeway speeds I was burning oil badly. If I stopped for any length of time a small amount of oil would pool and then get burned off when it started. After it burned off the pooled up oil, you couldn’t see it. My solution was to switch to LS9/LAS covers and make a PCV orifice to mimic the orifice in the LS2 valve covers (on top of the baffling in the LS9/LSA covers). Since then no oil burning issue and my exhaust tips are clean. If interested you can read about it here:
 

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@SWT RYD I agree with Topspin’s PCV line swap. That would be my first choice. That said, the valley plate is swapped out on a supercharger setup, making the line swap not possible on some setups.
 

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OK, Ilsa has had a lot of engine upgrade work lately including a 2300 supercharger, headers, forged internals, tunes, etc. I am now finding that after a trip (maybe an hour or so of steady running), the next time I start it, I get a LOT of oil smoke from the pipes. Not a pretty thing to see in our neighborhood. This only happens after a (kinda) long or longer trip. After running for a minute or so, the smoke stops. I checked the book to see if it might be a PCV valve problem, and it looks like these engines don't have PCV valves anymore.

May I please have a short education about what system now handles crankcase ventilation, and what might be happening with all of that smoke?
This sounds like you have both the air inflow to the crankcase (passenger valve cover) and the outflow from the crankcase (driver valve cover) both connected to the 2300 inlet housing. The problem will clear up if you put the drivers side line to the inlet and the passenger side line to the filtered air source like the OEM setup of the bellows.

Been in your place before........

MIke
 

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I was getting a lot of smoke after I ran the truck fairly hard, even with the Moroso catch can supposedly trapping the oil. Removed the valve cover lines from the supercharger inlet, ran them to a breather hiding on the firewall next to the driver's side hood hinge. No oil smoke since then.

Try removing the breather line from the supercharger inlet, but make sure you cap the now unused tube. If the oil burning stops after a few minutes, and doesn't come back when you run the truck hard, a small filter from NAPA or other with a tube at the bottom to attach the breather hose should do the trick.
 

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I was getting a lot of smoke after I ran the truck fairly hard, even with the Moroso catch can supposedly trapping the oil. Removed the valve cover lines from the supercharger inlet, ran them to a breather hiding on the firewall next to the driver's side hood hinge. No oil smoke since then.

Try removing the breather line from the supercharger inlet, but make sure you cap the now unused tube. If the oil burning stops after a few minutes, and doesn't come back when you run the truck hard, a small filter from NAPA or other with a tube at the bottom to attach the breather hose should do the trick.
Not a great solution as you're now just venting fumes to the atmosphere! Also, you've lost crankcase vacuum that is beneficial to engine health/performance.
 

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Not a great solution as you're now just venting fumes to the atmosphere! Also, you've lost crankcase vacuum that is beneficial to engine health/performance.
I agree it's not a great solution, but the alternative under the circumstances was to eliminate the supercharger. With the emission system connected to the supercharger inlet, I was emitting hundreds of times more fumes as the engine burned off the excess oil coming through the intake.
 
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