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Growing Older but Not Up
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I considered ordering the seals and "ears" made for the 05 intake box to add to my 04, to create the underhood seal and force the intake of cold air from the slot in the hood under the "Chevrolet" badge. With the three peices of foam and the two plastic ears totaling more than $120, I decided to try to make one up on my own. I bought a 6' piece of round polyethelene foam pipe insulatiion from Lowes and used some 1/2" aluminum angle stock I had to make the ears. After mounting the ears and using an industrial spray adhesive, I carefully cut and installed the foam to the box. After checking the fit, I ran the engine to create some heat, cut it off & shut the hood. After waiting for about 30 minutes I lifted the hood to find a formed, tight seal with the foam. My only concern was how it would hold up to the underhood heat. After returning from a 600 mile trip to the beach, everything's fine & I notice a little more low to mid RPM kick, but not a lot. Until there is a good aftermarket kit, I'lll stick with this. See the attached pics.
 

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SSR Pit Crew
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Dang, George!

Good looking and you're handy too? Your wife is a lucky woman! :lol

Seriously, it turned out pretty nice. I may have to hit Lowes this afternoon........ :thumbs
 

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A little" Yankee "enginuity

If ya can't buy it.......Then build it yourself.........Great job, George.....Thats how some things are finally coming about for the SSR........If tha powers that be.....arn't willing to do it......Then we'll do it ourselves......You lose and we win..... :seeya
 

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Growing Older but Not Up
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Discussion Starter #5
C1Trob said:
Looks a great idea. Can you help me out on what the reference to "ears" are?
The "ears " are the little plastic L shaped bars that bolt onto the sides of the intake box. they give you a flat surface to glue the foam to for the sides, the top already has a flat surface. Its really simple, go find an 05 and take a look at the intake seals, its the same box, just with seals.
 

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This looks as good as (if not better than) the installation on the '05 - '06. If the foam rubber on mine gets crappy, I'm going to follow suit.

Good job of "Simplistic Engineering". We all benefit.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Mike in AZ said:
This looks as good as (if not better than) the installation on the '05 - '06. If the foam rubber on mine gets crappy, I'm going to follow suit.

Good job of "Simplistic Engineering". We all benefit.

Mike
Mike, I LOVE that blue SSR! My first ride was a 68 Camaro, Lemans Blue, I 've had a soft spot for it ever since.
 

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Thanks Big Daddy,

I love the color more each time I see the sun on it.

Really good application of the foam under the hood. It seems too logical a fix to have taken so long.

Mike
 

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Big Daddy: I like your implementation a lot more than the factory one!

And, the factory parts actually total to much more than $120, as you did not have all the required parts listed.

This looks like a really good idea. I think I'll try it!


One caution: make sure that the foam you buy will not burn! You don't want to start an underhood fire in that hot underhood area.

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
bills03z said:
Has anyone tried the burn test? This modification is good old logic Very Innovative BD well done!!
I haven't tried to torch it, but if you look at the foam they install on the 05's, I can't see this being more vulnerable, that stuff looks lousy. I have driven it for a month with a long trip, 300 miles each way, to the beach with no issues. I have opened the hood and examined it closely after long stints at running temperature, no noticeable issues. The foam I used is polyethlene made for pipes and is designed to withstand tempature extremes. There is a lot of other plastic under the hood that I get more worried about. Hey, its worth a try, if its not for you you can take it our with no problems and you're only out about $10
 

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I am a believer again very innovative. I have No access to look at an 05 for the size of the right angle strips need to attach the poly. Could you provide the dimensions so I can manufacture them in advance? THX
 

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Growing Older but Not Up
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Discussion Starter #15
bills03z said:
I am a believer again very innovative. I have No access to look at an 05 for the size of the right angle strips need to attach the poly. Could you provide the dimensions so I can manufacture them in advance? THX
I don't know the exact dimensions, just measure the sides of the intake box
 

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I did this today.

I went a little "deluxe", using:

- Armacell self-sealing pipe insulation from Home Depot (pn 7812, or 0301411622 bar code). I checked the material safety data sheet for this stuff, and it apaprently won't burn. Just to be sure, I tried to light a piece of it with a BIC lighter, and after 60 seconds or so gave up. I DID manage to get some toxic-smelling fumes off it during the attempted ignition.

I bought the insurlation intended to insulate 3/4" copper or 1/2" iron pipe, and it has a diameter of about 2 inches. I removed the paper separaoptrs that kept the built-in sit from gluing shut, so that the tubing formed a full "hollow tunnel".

This stuff cuts GREAT with a SERRATED kitchen knife (sssshhh - don't tell my wife), as long as you SAW, not "crush". Perfect 45 degree angles.

- Two pieces of 90 degree aluminum angle, 1" x 1" flanges, 6" inches long each. I used aluminum so it can't corrode and I don't need to paint it.

- 4 Stainless steel 1/4" x 3/4" socket head bolts, 8 stainless steel washers, 4 stainless steel nuts with built-in nylon locks. Again, no corrosion.

- Contact cement, the kind you apply, wait at least 15 minutes, and then bond. This allowed me to glue the 3 pieces of foam into an assembly, which I then tested fitted to the tiop of the air intake, and then I applied contact cement to the bottom of the asembly and the top of the air intake. Went together really nice, and actually looks a lot better than the 05/06 factory install.

No photos, as no time to pause for that today - too many things on the schedule!

The cost of the materials when purchased piecemeal like this was close to $25 ! (Shock and awe at the Home Depot checkout) But, the nice man at Home Depot cut the two 6 inch pieces of aluminum angle for me with a hacksaw (I couldn't find mine!) right in the store.

I know I have a GREAT seal because the hood now has to be dropped from 6 inches up - cannot be just "closed and latched".

Wouldn't you know it, now that I have this "hot weather aid", Austin Texas has gotten COOL, so won't really know how much it helps, if any, until we get an unseasonable heat wave.

Jim G
 

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Growing Older but Not Up
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Discussion Starter #18
JimGnitecki said:
I did this today.

I went a little "deluxe", using:

- Armacell self-sealing pipe insulation from Home Depot (pn 7812, or 0301411622 bar code). I checked the material safety data sheet for this stuff, and it apaprently won't burn. Just to be sure, I tried to light a piece of it with a BIC lighter, and after 60 seconds or so gave up. I DID manage to get some toxic-smelling fumes off it during the attempted ignition.

I bought the insurlation intended to insulate 3/4" copper or 1/2" iron pipe, and it has a diameter of about 2 inches. I removed the paper separaoptrs that kept the built-in sit from gluing shut, so that the tubing formed a full "hollow tunnel".

This stuff cuts GREAT with a SERRATED kitchen knife (sssshhh - don't tell my wife), as long as you SAW, not "crush". Perfect 45 degree angles.

- Two pieces of 90 degree aluminum angle, 1" x 1" flanges, 6" inches long each. I used aluminum so it can't corrode and I don't need to paint it.

- 4 Stainless steel 1/4" x 3/4" socket head bolts, 8 stainless steel washers, 4 stainless steel nuts with built-in nylon locks. Again, no corrosion.

- Contact cement, the kind you apply, wait at least 15 minutes, and then bond. This allowed me to glue the 3 pieces of foam into an assembly, which I then tested fitted to the tiop of the air intake, and then I applied contact cement to the bottom of the asembly and the top of the air intake. Went together really nice, and actually looks a lot better than the 05/06 factory install.

No photos, as no time to pause for that today - too many things on the schedule!

The cost of the materials when purchased piecemeal like this was close to $25 ! (Shock and awe at the Home Depot checkout) But, the nice man at Home Depot cut the two 6 inch pieces of aluminum angle for me with a hacksaw (I couldn't find mine!) right in the store.

I know I have a GREAT seal because the hood now has to be dropped from 6 inches up - cannot be just "closed and latched".

Wouldn't you know it, now that I have this "hot weather aid", Austin Texas has gotten COOL, so won't really know how much it helps, if any, until we get an unseasonable heat wave.

Jim G
Good luck Jim, after a couple of months, I have no heat issues or damage to report.
 

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foam seal

i did what big daddy did but never used any ears or glue.the foam is split to begin with all i did was slice where the small horizontal fins on the plastic shroud are and let it sit in place.it took set after a couple of warm up cycles and it keeps the air going where it should be,towards the filter.if it gets worn out just get new foam and do it again.no mess with any gluing.
 
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