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I have a 2005 SSR 6sp with Mikes fan and Aux fan. I recently had a cam, headers and a new clutch put in. I was driving it to break in the clutch before putting it on the dyna. I put 450 miles, no problem. I was coming home yesterday I noticed the temp increasing. When I got it home the fan was not working, I turned on the air conditioner still no fan, the Aux fan with the manual temp control will not come on. Any suggestions as to where to start trouble shooting?
 

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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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I have a 2005 SSR 6sp with Mikes fan and Aux fan. I recently had a cam, headers and a new clutch put in. I was driving it to break in the clutch before putting it on the dyna. I put 450 miles, no problem. I was coming home yesterday I noticed the temp increasing. When I got it home the fan was not working, I turned on the air conditioner still no fan, the Aux fan with the manual temp control will not come on. Any suggestions as to where to start trouble shooting?
I’d suggest checking the fuse in the engine bay fuse block, front left closest to the engine. After that, send a PM to @Mike in AZ

He can get you sorted out pretty quickly

I suggest checking the fuse b/c, I had a tech jump my R incorrectly and blew the fuse. Running down the freeway things were fine as the truck cools without the fan at speeds greater than 35mph. However when I began to run around town, it overheated almost immediately when the fuse was blown. A/C and no fan, the fuse would be the first easy thing to check.

- Robert
:silver:
 

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I’d suggest checking the fuse in the engine bay fuse block, front left closest to the engine. After that, send a PM to @Mike in AZ

He can get you sorted out pretty quickly

I suggest checking the fuse b/c, I had a tech jump my R incorrectly and blew the fuse. Running down the freeway things were fine as the truck cools without the fan at speeds greater than 35mph. However when I began to run around town, it overheated almost immediately when the fuse was blown. A/C and no fan, the fuse would be the first easy thing to check.

- Robert
:silver:
:frown2:
As a former software/hardware involved person. I would venture to say the usual scenario is to ........say OK, what has changed since things were "normal".

In your case, a cam install I would think involved removal of the radiator and the cooling fan as well as other stuff. Just could be that the re-install of those items caused a failure/clitch in getting all the electrical connections back as they were before the "mods"

If you're somewhat supportive/confident of the source that did the cam, etc. install, I would be going back and saying............WTF. Prior to your "mods", I had zero/zip problems with overheating.........Now I do.

So, why do ya think that is occurring now.:surprise:
 

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There is a three pin connector near the fan motor. Due to the high current that a fan draws, I have seen these connectors melt down. A little corrosion and the connector over heats and melts. Then neither high or low will work.
 

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Root cause........

There is a three pin connector near the fan motor. Due to the high current that a fan draws, I have seen these connectors melt down. A little corrosion and the connector over heats and melts. Then neither high or low will work.
I have a bag of burned connectors. The connector that actually causes the failure is the one on the wire harness...... not the cooling fan.

My experience/intuition tells me that the root cause of the failure is most likely human error. It is ALWAYS the ground connection that melts. Not the terminal on the low speed wire or the high speed wire, but the one on the ground wire.
My theory is that at some time in the life of the vehicle, some technician with a voltmeter has tried to analyze whether or not power is being sent to the fan. Since it would take three hands to hold the connector/cable, touch the probe to the ground socket on the cable and touch the other probe to the power socket on the cable..... he shoves the ground probe into the connector socket. This holds the test lead ok, but spreads the tensioning spring part of the electrical terminal. With a diminished tension, the connection will heat up when the fan is powered. This will not be noticeable at first, but will worsen with time and power cycles on the fan wiring. Eventually, the carbon formed on the connection will increase to the point where the plastic melts and connection is fully lost.

I’m not raising the flag on this to cause inspections.... Just trying to answer the questions of how and why. The connection is rated at 42 amps. On the OEM fan, low speed draws about 12 amps and high speed draws about 29 amps. The cooling fan is very rarely on high speed..... actually only a minuscule percentage of the time.......

I strongly suspect that the problem with hdbear’s truck is a blown 60 amp fuse. The common tie point for the Main Fan and the Auxiliary fan is the fan power lug on the fuse box.

My two cents,

Mike
 
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