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Discussion Starter #1
It used to be cars had baked on enamel paint. So a wax would really help protect them.

But modern vehicles have an acrylic clearcoat. Anything you put on it is just going to get faded before it does. Plus you're going to wax in dirt you didn't see. And you might damage the clearcoat with small scratches. Or rub it off.

I can see in 5 years or so having a professional detailer go over it with some treatments. But why would I want to do anything but keep the clearcoat clean with water and a chamois?
 

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I used Zaino on mine. If you go through the complete washing, clay bar, prep and polish as recommended you will see a HUGE difference in the finish. The process will take out most if not all of the swirl marks in the paint. It enhances the color and gives it one fantastic shine. The end result puts the factory finish to shame.
Do a search for Zaino and read through some of the threads. Its well worth the time and money for the finish you get!!
 

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Clearcoats still need TLC - a good wax job will protect the clear finish from all forms of attack, whether it be birds, acid rain, dust, etc -

It's a bit of work to get the process started, but once you have it cleaned and waxes, adding more layers is extremely quick and easy - also makes washing and cleaning much quicker.

Found out last week how great the Zaino finish is. I was painting the brake calipers, and accidently got a brushstroke on the yellow finish - didn't notice till the next day. I used the Zaino detailer, and it literally washed off - could have been trouble if the finish had not been protected.

You can usually find the cars where someone thought clearcoat didn't need any help - the clear is lifting and peeling.

Ray
 

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While the paint and gloss on mine new '05 was really good, the differance after the full Zaino treatment was amazing. Even on the dark color, no scratches, no swirl marks, and a very wet looking slick surface. I finally tried it after all the posts on this site, and I have to say again the honest advice on this site is right on!
 

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While the paint technology has improved since the days of bake on acrylic enamel or even laquer the bottom like is still,at least, partially the same. Paints have solvents in them when sprayed on, even catalyzed paints though to a lesser degree. When the paint dries/cures the solvent evaporates out of the paint. In order to do this, the solvent escapes through very small pinholes. These are where dirt and other things can get into the paint. A good wax job will seal these pinholes and help keep the paint looking good longer.

My $0.02
 

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My Zaino story

At the reccommendation of many on the site, I bought some. Remember the days of "Turtle" waxing the corvette and rubbing and rubbing and the white residue leftover, etc,etc. sure hope I'm not going in that territory again with this Zaino.

Before I went to Orlando I went through the whole Zaino process. Took about 5 hours and each step done faithfully. When finished my wife complimented the shine, and said "Can you do mine" but that's another story. Looked like it just came off the showroom. :thumbs

The 420 mile trip was full of lovebugs. If you haven't encountered them, only a sandstorm is worse. thought I'd have a half day job getting the things off the truck. Had some Invisible Glass window cleaner with me. I'd start there. Sprayed it on, bugs almost dropped off, and with a little wipe they were gone. This is not an Invisible glass commercial, but rather Zaino did not allow the bugs to etch into the surface making this a real chore. Anyway 30 minutes had removed all the bugs and I was on my way. :thumbs

Another friend arrived, same bug situation, tried the Invisible glass. Took him 20 minutes to clean his outside mirrors. :mad No Zaino. Story complete....Zaino is KING!!!

P/P

Peace :flag
 

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The above testimonies are proof of why I became a Zaino distributor! Seeing is believing! Waxing is a waste of time, but Zaino isn't waxing! Waxing is old tecnology. Catch up! I am willing to help with any advice or questions. Don
 

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Discussion Starter #8
hdflstf said:
While the paint technology has improved since the days of bake on acrylic enamel or even laquer the bottom like is still,at least, partially the same. Paints have solvents in them when sprayed on, even catalyzed paints though to a lesser degree. When the paint dries/cures the solvent evaporates out of the paint. In order to do this, the solvent escapes through very small pinholes. These are where dirt and other things can get into the paint. A good wax job will seal these pinholes and help keep the paint looking good longer.

My $0.02
But don't they now put an acrylic clearcoat over the paint?

I think the situation is like the modern no-wax flooring. People spend tons of money on waxing it, but in fact waxing a no-wax floor is just going to screw it up. The wax fads, and you wax in imperfections.
 

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dougnc said:
But don't they now put an acrylic clearcoat over the paint?

I think the situation is like the modern no-wax flooring. People spend tons of money on waxing it, but in fact waxing a no-wax floor is just going to screw it up. The wax fads, and you wax in imperfections.
Yes, but.. the clearcoat is paint without the pigment. So the same would still apply.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
hdflstf said:
Yes, but.. the clearcoat is paint without the pigment. So the same would still apply.
Is there some sort of official GM paper that explains this? And what GM thinks is the best way to take care of the paint? It just doesn't make logical sense to me that GM didn't bake on something at the factory that's a lot better clear covering than something I can wipe on.

I still remember when I realised I'd pretty much ruined the no-wax tiles in my kitchen by applying layers of wax that was fading and had frozen in all sorts of dirts and streaks because I hadn't cleaned perfectly.

BTW, I did trying googling it but all I got was advertisments for wax companies.
 

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I would be surprized if you find GM reommending anything here. Zaino is not wax! Doesn't surprize me that wax ruined your floor. It is not good stuff! It will do some of the same stuff for your car; that is one reason that you won't catch me applying it to anything I own. I even use Zaino on my John Deere lawn mover. People are surprized that it is not new when it is actually three years old!
 

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Sorry, Doug

I don't agree that the paint should be good enough to last on its own - it needs help to keep looking good.

My SSR was purchased used, and was driven cross country. I had previously claybarred other vehicles, and after having read all the praise about Zaino, decided to give it the full treatment.

I couldn't believe how much debris came off the paint with the claybar. The finish felt like about a 2000 grit sandpaper, and became incredibly slippery just with the claybar process.

Paint is porous, due to the drying process, which was explained in an earlier post.
It traps dust, rail dust (little shards of metal that come of the brakes on rail cars) and assorted other bad things. When small pores open up, they are a cavity waiting to cause further damage. Acid rain loves porous paint jobs.

A good cleaning and polishing is the quickest and easiest way to protect your investment. The detailer 5 years from now can only get rid of some of the damage that has been caused by lack of maintenance.

I agree that multiple layers of a carnauba wax will eventually start to cause a buildup - which is reason for a good cleaning once in a while. The difference with Zaino is that the layers don't cause a buildup of wax - it just keeps getting better. If you go to their website, you'll see photos of vehicles with 20 or 30 layers, and an incredible shine. It's applied in very small amounts, so doesn't leave any residue to be cleaned up.

I've got about 10 coats on now, and washing has become very easy. Adding another 2 coats can be done in about 30 minutes per coat, with a bit of a break in between. It looks great on a yellow - it would be incredible on black.

I know you said in an earlier post you were lazy :) and this is definitely the lazy man's way to keep an SSR looking good. The first day is a bit long, but the rest is great.

Ray
 

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dougnc said:
It used to be cars had baked on enamel paint. So a wax would really help protect them.

But modern vehicles have an acrylic clearcoat. Anything you put on it is just going to get faded before it does. Plus you're going to wax in dirt you didn't see. And you might damage the clearcoat with small scratches. Or rub it off.

I can see in 5 years or so having a professional detailer go over it with some treatments. But why would I want to do anything but keep the clearcoat clean with water and a chamois?
:confused
Maybe you've missed the obvious.
Waxing has a definite "therapeutic" value.

It allows one to bond with their vehicle, especially one like an SSR.

Take care of your vehicle and it will take care of you :jester

Now get yourself out there and buff, buff, buff....... :yesnod
Jim
 

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Like the man says - Zaino ain't wax. Use just water and chamois at your own risk. In six months you'll be wondering where the dull look came from.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
SSR Fan said:
:confused
Maybe you've missed the obvious.
Waxing has a definite "therapeutic" value.

It allows one to bond with their vehicle, especially one like an SSR.

Take care of your vehicle and it will take care of you :jester

Now get yourself out there and buff, buff, buff....... :yesnod
Jim
Well, that's the thing. Zaino is probably a great product, still, it's hard to get away from the impression that it's value is more in it's theapeutic value than a real deficency of GM paint jobs. :)

I still want to get some "official" GM information on maintaining the paint job of a GM vehicle.
 

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How hard is zanio to use? I just waxed the ssr but have my patrol car to wax and they didnt clear coat to save money ( it had hail damage). Seems easy except maybe for the mixing
 

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Hey, Doug

I don't think anyone is going to make you polish and protect your SSR.

All your friends on this site are willing to release you from any responsibility to keep your SSR shiny. :lol

Ray
 

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JB,

The mixing part is really easy. They supply the mixing container, and I usually mix one ounce at a time (1/2 bottle). Just add 5 drops of the accelerator, and shake. If used sparingly, one ounce will do the SSR twice.

The key to getting a great finish is to do the claybar process first to clean the finish. Zaino doesn't have any cleaners in it, so can't lift dirt and debris on its own.

They really strange part at first is how little is used. Start with a damp applicator (supplied with the kit), spritz it with a shot of Zaino's detailer, and start wiping - no rubbing, and you need to keep track of where you've applied it, because is't almost invisible.

Un oh - Doug won't believe it's working because there's no thick gooey paste. :lol

I've used it on the SSR and our 99 Sonoma. Had the Sonoma in a show shortly after doing it last summer, and was asked several times if it was a new paint job, because it looked too good to be 6 years old.

Ray
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Flassh said:
Hey, Doug

I don't think anyone is going to make you polish and protect your SSR.

All your friends on this site are willing to release you from any responsibility to keep your SSR shiny. :lol

Ray
Well, it's like this. Some people on this web site swear that you have to take your engine apart, put new headers, intakes, ignition coils, and lord knows what on your SSR to take care of it.

Others swear you have to pop off the wheels and suspension, and put in new springs, suspension, something called "sway bars", and lower the SSR a foot or two in order to get maximum enjoyment.

At least one new proud SSR owner swears that the best thing to do with your GM paint job is to take the SSR completely apart, spray paint it, and put it back together again. If I remember correctly, to him this was a simple weekend job and he had time left over to go bowling with his wife.

A weekend job much like this Zaino thing. :)

The thing is, I'm very sure all of these things are good ideas, and people who promote these projects are very truthfully describing how enjoyable they are.

This kind of stuff just isn't me. A mechanic or artist I'm not.

And I really can't believe GM does a paint job that's going to fade in 6 months unless I apply all sorts of chemicals and do a lot of rubbing and swabbing. :lol
 

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Too funny!!!

You're right about the excesses many of us go to with our toys. My SSR and my wife's Sonoma are always freshly washed, clean and glowing, wheels polished, etc.

And by the way - the lowering is typically an inch or two. My springs should be here today!!!!

My work truck, which was more expensive than either of the others gets washed when the dealership does an oil change, and I pay my part time employee to clean and wax it once a year. It's all about what turns your crank.

Your SSR will probably live happily with just being washed once in a while for the first couple of years, but if you want to really see the difference, hit a car show where someone who has lavished TLC and Zaino on his SSR, and askpolitely if he'll let you run your finger on a freshly cleaned fender surface - then do the same with yours. I think you'll find quite a difference in the feel.

Ray
 
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