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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Below is my take a sealing up the K&N intake filter box and plastic shroud over the latch and into the radiator box.

I tried several different ways to get there, but wasn't satisfied, until what you see now.

High temp black RTV at seems in the bottom and back where it isn't welded.

3/4 wide x 7/16 thick closed cell foam on the base of the box, between the intake box and the top radiator (1st pic)

1 1/4 wide x 7/16 thick closed cell foam on the bottom of the plastic shroud that goes over the hood latch, over the top radiator mount and into the K&N intake box(2nd pic). The measurements in the pic are after a few rounds of trial and error. The humps are 3 layers thick to bring them up to the level of the middle section, with the long one piece across the top being layer 4. I did the humps with 2 curved layers and one flat one on the top. I then cut the excess off the curves and then the one long one that you see. The foam is slit partially through (and through all the layers) in the shroud slots on either side to allow it to seal around the K&N intake box. The 2 1/2 in is important dimension as that allows the tape to clear the hood bumper mounts.

I like it. You can't see it except for the little bit of foam in the slots where the two pieces seal together. The seal doesn't require the radiator shroud to be "mashed down" and isn't deformed.

YMMV. Not everyone qualifies for the advertised rate. No warranty expressed or implied. Do not fold spindle or mutilate. Use only a #2 pencil. :wink2:

I post this hoping someone finds it useful. I aware of the threads on how well the stock air box works, but I like the K&N.

Updated with diagram/pics to show where the leaks were and seals are now.

- Robert
:silver:

P.S. As I'm rarely satisfied, I may work on the seal to the hood, but that is another project for another day (or two).
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Did you buy the whole K&N Cold air package Kit? I have a custom hood but the Kit came with all the seals metal replacement plates and seals directly to the hood and is exposed to only cold outside air through the scoop hole in the front of the hood you can see on my Avatar picture to the left here. Good luck.
 

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Premium Member
2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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Discussion Starter #3
Did you buy the whole K&N Cold air package Kit. I have a custom hood but the Kit came with all the seals metal replacement plates and seals directly to the hood and is exposed to only cold outside air.
Yep, I bought the kit. Mine looks just like yours, but is now sealed to only draw air over the radiator shroud. I could tell it was drawing air from other places as there was always a fine layer of dust at the seams in the back from the engine bay, and coming from under the radiator shroud. Both places are hot.
 

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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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Discussion Starter #4
Also, if you pull the seal around the top of the box up to where it is barely on and then shut the hood, I bet when you open the hood you’ll find the seal didn’t move down onto the filter box... or at least it doesn’t on mine.

- Robert
 

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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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Discussion Starter #5
Updated initial post with a couple more pics showing the approximate location of the seals when it is all together... and to confirm for Auggie Doggie, that mine was like his.

- Robert
:silver:
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Just looked mine over and it is sealed. I think the difference is my custom hood and the air flow as the vehicle is moving forward with the hood closed. If any hot air could leak it would have to be traveling backwards against the forward acceleration. Not likely. The pan K&N provided to be changed out it sealed. The hood seals when down so the only place the outside air can enter is through the hood scoop on the front edge which leads directly into the air filter and into the engine. Then the hood is raised in the middle and channels any hot air to the rear where it exits via 8 holes that are each about 3 inches across near the windshield. The hood is raised in that spot. It can also suck cool air in those holes as it slides off the windshield and out the bottom of the open chassis in and around the engine. Anyway with my set up no hot air can get into the throttle body. Good luck with yours.
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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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Discussion Starter #9
Not sure they make a performance difference, but I gotta say, they sure look pretty.
Thanks for the compliment.

True. Performance improvement is likely negligible as there are way too many other factors to consider. As Auggie and I exchanged, when the vehicle is moving forward, there will be more air coming in over the spear and under the hood emblem overcoming any leaks I plugged. My satisfaction comes from knowing it is functioning better, my filter should stay cleaner longer (assuming outside air is cleaner) and I won't be wiping the fine dust from those areas all the time. Lastly it looks like I wasn't even there.


That can probably be said for other nice looking but questionable performance components on our vehicle.


Dave
:agree Well said.
 

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That can probably be said for other nice looking but questionable performance components on our vehicle.


Dave
No truer words have been spoken. I have found that, then it comes down to did you enjoy doing the project of installing it, learn something doing it or does it make it look better? If it has met any of those three then that is probably the bigger gain.

On most newer computer controlled cars the biggest gains are going to come from changing the computer settings than changing parts, until you get into changing things that will make the engine breath better. Heads and Camshafts will do a lot for them but again you have to change the computer to use what gains you make.
 

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No truer words have been spoken. I have found that, then it comes down to did you enjoy doing the project of installing it, learn something doing it or does it make it look better? If it has met any of those three then that is probably the bigger gain.

On most newer computer controlled cars the biggest gains are going to come from changing the computer settings than changing parts, until you get into changing things that will make the engine breath better. Heads and Camshafts will do a lot for them but again you have to change the computer to use what gains you make.
Can ya recall changing out the plugs along with a new points and condenser and if a real nutball, ya may have thrown in a new distributor cap and rotor too.>:)
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Thanks for the compliment.

True. Performance improvement is likely negligible as there are way too many other factors to consider. As Auggie and I exchanged, when the vehicle is moving forward, there will be more air coming in over the spear and under the hood emblem overcoming any leaks I plugged. My satisfaction comes from knowing it is functioning better, my filter should stay cleaner longer (assuming outside air is cleaner) and I won't be wiping the fine dust from those areas all the time. Lastly it looks like I wasn't even there.




:agree Well said.
Looks and works good.
 

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Can ya recall changing out the plugs along with a new points and condenser and if a real nutball, ya may have thrown in a new distributor cap and rotor too.>:)
I was a gear head from back when we had to have dual point distributor to be on the cool kid list and have that big old yellow Accell coil hanging on the firewall. It took for ever for me to believe that a new HEI could be better than the dual point set up. Man was I wrong on that one. Drop in the HEI hook up one wire for power and the tach wire and done. Go in and once a year throw in a new module, cap and rotor if you felt like really tuning the car up. That or going in monthly if not weekly and setting point gaps, replacing points and condensers. Oh and let's not forget the good old solid lifter cam shafts. If a little was good than too much was just right. And back in the old days when money was tight, no one bothered changing valve springs to match the solid cams. Valve float just meant you needed to shift it sooner.
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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No truer words have been spoken. I have found that, then it comes down to did you enjoy doing the project of installing it, learn something doing it or does it make it look better? If it has met any of those three then that is probably the bigger gain.

On most newer computer controlled cars the biggest gains are going to come from changing the computer settings than changing parts, until you get into changing things that will make the engine breath better. Heads and Camshafts will do a lot for them but again you have to change the computer to use what gains you make.
I don't know which part did what or if the Super Dyno Tune did it but my SSR has gained more horsepower and torque and sounds and feels much faster out of the hole and that is what I was after. Only money and I did not tear the motor apart or change the reliability. Just made it run much, much better.

The guy tuning our SSR said he figured 452.5 horsepower and 461.25 torque at the crank now vs 390 horsepower and 405 torque from the factory. Huge increase from stock plus very smooth and more responsive. Reset cooling fans, shift points and firmness and overall adjusted everything. This was all done after the K&N Cold air package, the corvette servo, the 90MM throttle body port and polish done by Jeremy at Faster Proms in Florida, the Taylor Helix throttle body spacer, the Jet high performance mass air sensor, and the Magnaflow true duals exhaust with Mikes 5 inch tips.
 

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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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Discussion Starter #15
I was a gear head from back when we had to have dual point distributor to be on the cool kid list and have that big old yellow Accell coil hanging on the firewall. It took for ever for me to believe that a new HEI could be better than the dual point set up. Man was I wrong on that one. Drop in the HEI hook up one wire for power and the tach wire and done. Go in and once a year throw in a new module, cap and rotor if you felt like really tuning the car up. That or going in monthly if not weekly and setting point gaps, replacing points and condensers. Oh and let's not forget the good old solid lifter cam shafts. If a little was good than too much was just right. And back in the old days when money was tight, no one bothered changing valve springs to match the solid cams. Valve float just meant you needed to shift it sooner.
That is my next project after Elsie gets closer to my end point of projected mods.

70 Vette with a 71 LS6 crate motor, Hooker side pipes and flares. My grandfather swapped the LS5 out. It's essentially the Corvette Chevy had in the options list, but never made. It was my grandfather's since '73-ish and "On the shelf" in my garage for the last 5. I'm considering going with pointless ignition if it looks stock-enough. I can't stand sanding points, or replacing them, setting the dwell and all that, only to have it deteriorate.

Lighting her off is good for the soul. She really rumbles. Make me tear up, memories and she runs really rich :wink2:.

Wife keeps asking, What about her? My response: still in the planning stages and acquiring parts. Gotta get Elsie done first and the kid outta college.

- Robert
:silver:
 

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Below is my take a sealing up the K&N intake filter box and plastic shroud over the latch and into the radiator box.

I tried several different ways to get there, but wasn't satisfied, until what you see now.

High temp black RTV at seems in the bottom and back where it isn't welded.

3/4 wide x 7/16 thick closed cell foam on the base of the box, between the intake box and the top radiator (1st pic)

1 1/4 wide x 7/16 thick closed cell foam on the bottom of the plastic shroud that goes over the hood latch, over the top radiator mount and into the K&N intake box(2nd pic). The measurements in the pic are after a few rounds of trial and error. The humps are 3 layers thick to bring them up to the level of the middle section, with the long one piece across the top being layer 4. I did the humps with 2 curved layers and one flat one on the top. I then cut the excess off the curves and then the one long one that you see. The foam is slit partially through (and through all the layers) in the shroud slots on either side to allow it to seal around the K&N intake box. The 2 1/2 in is important dimension as that allows the tape to clear the hood bumper mounts.

I like it. You can't see it except for the little bit of foam in the slots where the two pieces seal together. The seal doesn't require the radiator shroud to be "mashed down" and isn't deformed.

YMMV. Not everyone qualifies for the advertised rate. No warranty expressed or implied. Do not fold spindle or mutilate. Use only a #2 pencil. :wink2:

I post this hoping someone finds it useful. I aware of the threads on how well the stock air box works, but I like the K&N.

Updated with diagram/pics to show where the leaks were and seals are now.

- Robert
:silver:

P.S. As I'm rarely satisfied, I may work on the seal to the hood, but that is another project for another day (or two).
Nice work - 1% hp increase for every 10 deg. temp. drop!
 
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I was a gear head from back when we had to have dual point distributor to be on the cool kid list and have that big old yellow Accell coil hanging on the firewall. It took for ever for me to believe that a new HEI could be better than the dual point set up. Man was I wrong on that one. Drop in the HEI hook up one wire for power and the tach wire and done. Go in and once a year throw in a new module, cap and rotor if you felt like really tuning the car up. That or going in monthly if not weekly and setting point gaps, replacing points and condensers. Oh and let's not forget the good old solid lifter cam shafts. If a little was good than too much was just right. And back in the old days when money was tight, no one bothered changing valve springs to match the solid cams. Valve float just meant you needed to shift it sooner.
Ah yes, the old Super Coil - here's what became of my last one. I still have a few Accel dual points, for AMC V8s, laying around for old school projects that I run into.

I remember throwing on my first MSD box in the late 70s - that changed everything, no more point/condeser issues and plugs lasted significantly longer!

Speaking of old school, I just changed my LS valvetrain to an old school setup - maybe I'll throw a thread up on it, though there's not much interest here on that sort of stuff.
 

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I like the K&N appearance as well but those crinkles on the upper left & right corners of the tubing would drive me nuts.
I haven't seen anyone attempt a cure for that - figure they could have designed it better at the outset.
 

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I don't like that kinky look either so I'm thinking if you could fish rope through the seal would that round out the two kinks? Just a thought.

Dave
 

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I don't know which part did what or if the Super Dyno Tune did it but my SSR has gained more horsepower and torque and sounds and feels much faster out of the hole and that is what I was after. Only money and I did not tear the motor apart or change the reliability. Just made it run much, much better.

The guy tuning our SSR said he figured 452.5 horsepower and 461.25 torque at the crank now vs 390 horsepower and 405 torque from the factory. Huge increase from stock plus very smooth and more responsive. Reset cooling fans, shift points and firmness and overall adjusted everything. This was all done after the K&N Cold air package, the corvette servo, the 90MM throttle body port and polish done by Jeremy at Faster Proms in Florida, the Taylor Helix throttle body spacer, the Jet high performance mass air sensor, and the Magnaflow true duals exhaust with Mikes 5 inch tips.
Augie, the only way you'll really know if the K&N enhances performance is to do dyno runs with the same SSR in the same environmental conditions. One with your K&N and the other with a stock air filter system. If there's significant performance increase with the K&N, you've got bragging rights. If not, you've got a nice piece of bling. At some point, I hope someone does this so we can have a good baseline and put the debate to bed.
 
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