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My low beams were working fine. I was doing some work on my R and left the doors open and was in and out of it running the radio and I let the battery run down. The Battery was installed in April of '19 so it was a fresh battery. I tried charging it to no avail. I pulled it and since it was under warranty I got a new one for free. Installed the battery. At this point I noticed low beams were not working. Not thinking both beams would stop working at the same time I thought it was a fuse or a relay or whatever. After reading a lot at fanatics problems at this website I kept thinking it was not the lights. Finally I decided to buy a new set of low beams and, voila, both bulbs were burned out.

Was it the running down and replacement of the battery? I don't know. But I can see at night again.
(y)
 

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One of the SoCal Nuts
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Are you running standard Low beams or LEDs?
 

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'06 FPR Smokin Asphalt; '04 Ulta Violet
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Hmmmmm Agree doesn't seem like both would burn out at the same time, but it's fixed=good thing.

Nick
 

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Slingshot Rules!
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Odd, very odd but definitely Good News and glad to hear a simple fix.

! :cool: ! (y) ! :cool: ! (y) ! :cool: !
 

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The lower voltage probably caused the bulbs to run hotter. I know it sounds backwards but e over ir. "E" electromotive force or voltage, "I" is amperage and "R" is resistance. When the voltage goes down, it effects both amperage and resistance.
 

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The lower voltage probably caused the bulbs to run hotter. I know it sounds backwards but e over ir. "E" electromotive force or voltage, "I" is amperage and "R" is resistance. When the voltage goes down, it effects both amperage and resistance.
Not so sure about logic...

Volts = Amps x Resistance

So, if the battery voltage drops, either the Amps or Resistance must be less.

Since the circuit resistance remained unchanged (nothing has been added or removed from circuit), that means there is less Amps flowing when the supplied battery voltage drops.

So the lights didn't 'burn out' from amperage as it was actually less after the battery voltage dropped.

It is a weird situation though
... perhaps black magic???
 

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Not so sure about logic...

Volts = Amps x Resistance

So, if the battery voltage drops, either the Amps or Resistance must be less.

Since the circuit resistance remained unchanged (nothing has been added or removed from circuit), that means there is less Amps flowing when the supplied battery voltage drops.

So the lights didn't 'burn out' from amperage as it was actually less after the battery voltage dropped.

It is a weird situation though
... perhaps black magic???
As the amps provided by a weakend battery went down, I believe the resistance would go up. I could be wrong.
 

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2004 Slingshot Yellow
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Seems odd both would go out at once. Only a surge could do that but the fuses and relays would prevent it. Low voltage or Amps would not affect the bulbs. Could possibly be oxidized connectors but that's remote.
I've had the low beam relay go out twice on me now and I keep a spare in the glove box.
Greg
 

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Cantankerous SSR CaretakR
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While working on the interior you didn't pull the emergency brake on and then release it later did you?
 

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I knew a Marine Master Sergeant that explained light bulbs don't work by putting out light. They work by sucking in darkness. You can tell this is true because when a bulb burns out there is a little spot of darkness rolling around inside the bulb. This was back in the day when incandescent bulbs were still legal.

Apparently, your bulbs sucked in all the darkness they could and you had a closely matched pair.
 

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As the amps provided by a weakend battery went down, I believe the resistance would go up. I could be wrong.
Actually if its an incandescent light bulb as the current (amps) go down so does the resistance.
Electrons don't like traveling though hot elements so as the amps go down so does the temperature and thus the resistance.

But, i dont believe this has can be proven to relate one bulb burns out and that causes the other to burn out.
Its one of those SH** happens kind of things and Murphy's laws are in control
 

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"Actually if its an incandescent light bulb as the current (amps) go down so does the resistance.
Electrons don't like traveling though hot elements so as the amps go down so does the temperature and thus the resistance."

Thank you for the correction. I knew the resistance changed, just didn't know which way.
 

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Because @VI Ken mentioned ohms law and V = A x R, I will go further

As a demonstration to this in class we measure the resistance of a 1056 light bulb to be about 1 ohm. So ohms law would calculate to 12 volt /1 ohm = 12 amps

But when connected to a 12 v circuit it only draws about 1 amp, (12 volts / 12 ohms = 1 amp) this illustrates that the resistance increases as the filament heats up and provides light.

The lab manual even states measured resistance WILL NOT equal working resistance due to the heat of an operating bulb.

Also the bulbs are wired in parallel, and changes in one branch of a parallel circuit WILL NOT effect the other branches -- but will effect the total circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the info. I didn't pull ebrake when replacing battery. Everything is working good now. Now I need to replace dome light in bed with LED bulb. Any suggestions there? These are 280 milliamps. I understand I can replace #40 fuse to a 1AMP.
2112 LED bulb.jpg
 

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One of the SoCal Nuts
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Looks like the 1 Watt that I put in and the 1 amp is hold just fine.
 
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