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Caretaker of Max'sSSR
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181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good to see a reasoned opinion on the SSR and perhaps the biggest reason why it did not sell well. $$$$$ And.....recognition that it is a loved vehicle by some. (that's you and me :) )

 

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Registered
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3,785 Posts
Here's my question. Do SSR owners really care?
Well, yeah, I do. If SSR's had sold better, there would be more around. I wouldn't have to drive 400 miles to hang out with another SSR owner.

And let's not forget parts availability. If more had been made and sold, parts availability wouldn't be the issue that it is today.
 

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SSR Believer
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2,806 Posts
Great little article, thanks for posting Craig!

Agreed that it would have been interesting to see how well it would have faired with the right price and on a Corvette platform.

I really like the unique aspect of our rides; it's almost always the only one in town or at a car show. But wizzr's right, it makes socializing with like-minded folks challenging. Plus I'm sitting here looking at an Eckler's "Classic Chevy" tri-five catalog. You could probably build a 57 Chevy from scratch if you had a mind to. Wouldn't it be great if the same applied to aftermarket parts for our R's?! :sneaky:
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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11,748 Posts
One must remember the SSR was a specialty vehicle and specialty vehicles are usually high priced and don't sell well and have low production numbers. They are designed and sold to generate curiosity and high interest in the brand. People see them in ads on TV, at auto shows, and in the showroom and it draws them in but when they leave they buy a wagon or Impala for the family etc. In the long run it is good for us because we have a rare and awesome vehicle. That is why I wish folks would stop giving them away price wise. It is hurting all of us. Our R's should be rare and collectible. Keep on Truckin!
 

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Super Road Rocket Pilot
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6,758 Posts
How in the hell does the writer think it looks like a "bubbly Blazer"? What does that even mean? Just because it has a TB chassis he thinks it looks like an SUV? He lost me in the heading of the article................. It has a vintage character and looks like a very good modern rendition of the 50's Chevy truck. Wonder what he thinks it should look like?

And I do NOT think it was a failure. GM did what they could with it but I do not think it was ever meant to be a long term production vehicle like the HHR. Well, even that one only lasted 7 years. Maybe they cut the production off a little too soon because some people still had more ideas, but I am pretty sure long term production was not for this type of vehicle. With better sales, cheaper entry fee, and more program money there might have been another 2 or 3 years. Prowler was only built for 5, Thunderbird 3,

It's quirky and fun, not meant for the masses, take it or leave it.
 

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Tech Support/Research
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1,901 Posts
Not only is that article superficial- there were many reasons why SSRs didn't sell well other than initial cost and weight- but it is inaccurate relative the statements like "wrong time, wrong place" (positive public reaction to the show truck, and Chevrolet's own marketing studies, showed that the clamor for a nostalgic truck was right at the time) and reference to the SSR originally being planned on a Corvette chassis (there is no reference to this in Gary Witzenberg's book and a truck/SUV chassis was considered from the beginning of the program).
 

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Premium Member
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528 Posts
Most articles seem to have opinions that it is a useless pickup, not fast enough etc. It is a unique vehicle not trying to be any of those. Did not help that as usual the stealership' added $20000 or more at point of sale.
As already stated, who cares I like mine, as do all fanatics.Always enjoy driving, hard to believe I have owned it for 15 years.
 

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Slingshot Rules!
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82,994 Posts

Just another dose of BS and Ignorance concerning the SSR . . .

My theory as to why the SSR did not sell as some desired . . . GREED. Primarily, DEALER GREED.

Shortly after the SSR hit the streets and became available to the general public, I began searching for the perfect SSR. My search took me all over Southern Arizona as well as the Phoenix Metropolitan area plus even over to Southern New Mexico. Overall, I casually searched for more than a year and every Chevrolet Dealer I contacted was zapping the price up by at least $5k over Sticker Price. Some even as high as $10k over Sticker.

Remember, a Window Sticker Price has more than ample profits built in.

I grew up in a General Motors family and have driven General Motors Vehicles all my life and was shocked at the GREED and ARROGANCE plus a great deal of STUPIDITY with the majority of the sales personnel.

Bottom line . . . we have the GREEDY Chevrolet Dealers to thank.

! :cool: ! :p ! :cool: ! :p ! :cool: !
 

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Administrator
PEDIGREE SSR
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8,861 Posts
Honestly the SSR was never intended to be someone's work truck nor ever to be built on a Corvette platform. It was to be a cool 2 seater retro Hot Rod that looked like older trucks from the 50's but the convivence and blend of modern technology which also had a lot of trunk space to boot! Most car enthusiast and writers today never ever really understood the great romantic feel and looks of the SSR along with their beautiful sculptured fenders that the SSR had. The SSR still draws admiring looks even today. A retro truck that has a hard top convertible ... wow what else could a super cool hot-rod have?
 

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Premium Member
2004 Slingshot Yellow
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2,285 Posts
That's the first time I have heard that the SSR was supposed to be on a Corvette Platform! The Concept was on a Chevy S-10 platform. I think these writers just do a little research then make **** up to fill white space hoping no one really notices.
 

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Super Moderator
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14,220 Posts
I didn't read through all of the posts and I expect much of this was covered (I liked MarcNY post) - we should be happy
I personally prefer the idea I am not the owner of one 200000 SSR's - losing the Limited Production would not do any of us any good for current value.

GM shareholders may not share my opinion, but kudos to Richard Waggoner for his promise to "make it happen" - otherwise we would all be in Camaros (not a bad thing but not for me).
His promise to bring it to market by year-end 2003 was an issue - the lack of the 6.0L is a bit of a mystery as the SoCal Bonneville had the 6L and it was #2 out of the chute.
The Hot Rod group wanted the power, so I believe this was a big issue. We have a lot of "hot rod" guy owners with the 5.3L

The SSR was a huge undertaking by GM - can't imagine the cost but Bob Walczyk indicated the Slingshot prototype (Rte 66) that was hand-built was estimated in excess of $500k.
Think about the cost of development over 5 or 6 years, the cost of the Concept, the 32 Ex VIN's plus 3X6959EX (eventual Indy winner) - I think we were designated to failure.
The SSR thing may have been a big part of GM filing Chapter 11 November 2005. At this time there were proposed changes for MY2007 so it was not a GM idea to ditch the SSR.

Filing for bankruptcy leads to the closure of 8 small facilities, the speciality centre LCC being one of the first.

Personally, I believe it was sort of a domino effect - no idea how a Corvette frame could have changed things

As Marc said - The SSR still draws admiring looks even today. A retro truck that has a hardtop convertible ... Wow what else could a super cool hot-rod have?
And it does not matter if you have a 5.3 or a 6L - still get the same thumbs up every time out

I have yet to read an SSR related article by anyone that knows WTF they are talking about.
 
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