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Robert said that I would not be getting the original hoses back.
I don't know what he did with them.
As I said before, I had asked him in writing and in conversation, to keep the specifications
because others would want SSR Hoses also.
Hopefully the situation can get straightened out.

Dave
 

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Trygodfirst
2006 FPR SSR PAC BLUE AUTOMATIC
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1,456 Posts
Agree with @SWT RYD , there should already be an extra set someone could borrow to get their set made. If no answer, I'm sure @Trygodfirst will offer up his extra set when he's done. He seems to be a real helpful feller!
That’s a fantastic idea and plan. Yes I will definitely give and send mine to them. This way they can have a set there for the next ssr person to get theirs done. Then that person can send their old set back once replaced with the new set. @Firetruck thank you for this and @RG thank you for getting the process begun. Now no one will have to pull their lines prior to getting their braided lines in. That is as long as everyone keeps the process going. Kinda like how we send those metal compression frames with our roof struts back to mike. Also anyone wanting to donate the old lines to them that too would be nice.
In my talk with them they were concerned that without MY ORIGINAL lines the ones he made not align?? I said well if I ordered a set of OEM lines they would fit so why do they need mine ahead of time? Only reason he came up with was they stripped the brackets and some fitting off ours. Once I showed him the part numbers for all 2003-2006 ssr were the same he could use an 03 set to replace an 06.
My question is what happened to The originals that RG sent in. Seems like that would be the ones to use for a template instead of somebody going out and buying some.
they stripped his for parts/fittings
 

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Trygodfirst
2006 FPR SSR PAC BLUE AUTOMATIC
Joined
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1,456 Posts
That’s a fantastic idea and plan. Yes I will definitely give and send mine to them. This way they can have a set there for the next ssr person to get theirs done. Then that person can send their old set back once replaced with the new set. @Firetruck thank you for this and @RG thank you for getting the process begun. Now no one will have to pull their lines prior to getting their braided lines in. That is as long as everyone keeps the process going. Kinda like how we send those metal compression frames with our roof struts back to mike. Also anyone wanting to donate the old lines to them that too would be nice.
In my talk with them they were concerned that without MY ORIGINAL lines the ones he made not align?? I said well if I ordered a set of OEM lines they would fit so why do they need mine ahead of time? Only reason he came up with was they stripped the brackets and some fitting off ours. Once I showed him the part numbers for all 2003-2006 ssr were the same he could use an 03 set to replace an 06.

they stripped his for parts/fittings
I also agree with and wonder why they would buy and stock the parts they are stripping off ours. Probably cost to get the brackets. I don’t know but it looks like we’re on a good path to keep it rolling once I get my set to them. Now I’ll be at the mercy of my mechanic to pull mine and install the braided lines. Thanks y’all love it. Once I figured out how to get my braided lines here WITHOUT removing my originals guess I couldn’t see the forest for the trees.
Thanks again men
 

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6,488 Posts
That’s a fantastic idea and plan. Yes I will definitely give and send mine to them. This way they can have a set there for the next ssr person to get theirs done. Then that person can send their old set back once replaced with the new set. @Firetruck thank you for this and @RG thank you for getting the process begun. Now no one will have to pull their lines prior to getting their braided lines in. That is as long as everyone keeps the process going. Kinda like how we send those metal compression frames with our roof struts back to mike. Also anyone wanting to donate the old lines to them that too would be nice.
In my talk with them they were concerned that without MY ORIGINAL lines the ones he made not align?? I said well if I ordered a set of OEM lines they would fit so why do they need mine ahead of time? Only reason he came up with was they stripped the brackets and some fitting off ours. Once I showed him the part numbers for all 2003-2006 ssr were the same he could use an 03 set to replace an 06.

they stripped his for parts/fittings
The only part that they could reuse is the bracket, the rear doesn't have a bracket. You can't undo a crimped fitting. But still material and labor at $80 each isn't really a bad price. Just my two cents.
 

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Sounds like another project for Mike in AZ to take on. He's done a great job of seeing through the fog and finding a solution to a problem. The rerouted heater hoses, upgraded suspension bushings, upgraded radiator fans and ABS shield are great examples. It's a good thing he's always looking for something new to alleviate the boredom.🤪🤪🤪

In this case, if the bracket is the only salvageable component, it wouldn't take a brain surgeon to source a supplier who can build those.

It makes no sense to have to leave your brake system vulnerable to air/moisture/dust for weeks while waiting for a new product to arrive.
 

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I was in the stainless hose business for 39 years, A Performance products, Inc., and still have a hard time believing that Goodridge nor Earls, and there are others, will not prototype and make a kit for these vehicles. Once done they would maintain the specs and be able to provide the kit going forward. $80 a hose seems a bit steep to me, but haven't priced anything like that in 2+ years. Most all we provided were for competition vehicles and truly, except for the look there is little benefit over a set of new rubber. Slightly firmer pedal on some, not all, vehicles.
$.02 as usual
:rolleyes:
Your work history makes me think you would be able to address this question. I don't see the pic in this particular post, but Dictator has shown the I.D. (inside diameter) in one pic of his "stock" brake hoses and beside it , his new stainless hoses. He pointed out that the I.D. of the new hoses were quite bigger in diameter than the stock hoses and indeed the pic shows that.


If all that was done was to (swap) stock hoses for stainless hoses WITHOUT any other brake "mod".......wouldn't that call for greater pedal pressure.

I've been reviewing articles and this one covers a lot of info on piston bore size, etc. If I read it all correctly, it would seem a master cylinder bore size change might be called for when swapping out to lines with a much bigger i.d. size.

What say you.....................:unsure:
 

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2005 Chevrolet SSR manual transmission
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605 Posts
:rolleyes:
Your work history makes me think you would be able to address this question. I don't see the pic in this particular post, but Dictator has shown the I.D. (inside diameter) in one pic of his "stock" brake hoses and beside it , his new stainless hoses. He pointed out that the I.D. of the new hoses were quite bigger in diameter than the stock hoses and indeed the pic shows that.


If all that was done was to (swap) stock hoses for stainless hoses WITHOUT any other brake "mod".......wouldn't that call for greater pedal pressure.

I've been reviewing articles and this one covers a lot of info on piston bore size, etc. If I read it all correctly, it would seem a master cylinder bore size change might be called for when swapping out to lines with a much bigger i.d. size.

What say you.....................:unsure:
Well, we are dealing with a four wheel disc brake system on our SSRs and possibly most Fanatics second or third hobby vehicle may be as well, but older restorations with drum brakes are a slightly different story as there is actual fluid movement to actuate the shoes, but in general the same rules apply. First let it be said that modern brake rubber pressure hoses are a very good product. They have to meet FMVSS and SAE rules, look those up and you will find they are very exacting. They are generally not problematic on OEM brake systems and generally last a LONG time. A problem in high performance situations where immediate braking action is desired, as they age they tend to expand more(maybe fatigue of the reinforcing braid) and greater pedal movement is required for the same braking effect. But keep in mind on an ABS vehicle(most now-a-days) full deceleration braking is achieved by jamming the pedal to the limit and let the ABS controller modulate braking to all four wheels. As long as the hose doesn't rupture your good. Within limits neither inner diameter nor length affect braking. With our well engineered four wheel disc system pressure change, not fluid movement, modulates braking. With stainless there are three sizes in general usage, #4, the original most everyone, hot rod, drag or road-race & even circle track + contemporary aircraft used early on because it was commonly available. It has an approximate 3/16"ID. #3, available since WWII & before, became available in the surplus markets due to demand and when Aeroquip Corp introduced new product to market around 1978 you could get it new as well. It looked nicer by far and it's smaller ID, about 1/8"+, would transfer pressure more quickly through the same length of tubing, so aftermarket & OEM race parts suppliers started making special hose ends and adapters to satisfy the demand. The steel tubing in your braking system for discs is usually #3 hard tubing as well and I suspect factory rubber matches that closely. Formula One & purpose built racing vehicles have even used #2 with a tiny ID of about 1/16", used behind aircraft panels in the day to plumb instruments, but this was an extension of the speed of the pressure signal and beyond our needs. We seldom have to brake quickly from 200MPH+. At auto braking pressures stainless #3 or #4 undergoes no(0) expansion so our rule of braking effect is optimized over the life of the hose, infinite unless physically damaged, which can happen if they get kinked. That was a problem getting a DOT waiver for street car usage years back. Covering the stainless with extruded plastic, originally black & now in colors, plus codifying retention of the ends solved that. My own personal preference after all that, is to use original OEM rubber & if you think the pedal is spongy after 10 years or so, replace them. That said there is nothing intrinsically wrong with the stainless, if it floats your boat I would have gladly sold you a set up until about two years ago.
Master cylinder bore vs caliper piston size is a design parameter of the system and hose ID should have no effect unless you are designing a car from the ground up and a larger or smaller hose ID would be used throughout. We are only talking about 3' or so in total of our hydraulic system.
Most current aftermarket kits & replicas are #3 and that is what pics in the Forum look like, I didn't see @Dicktator 's.
WHEW, that was far longer than I planned and there is more, but hopefully this answers your query! o_O
 

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Trygodfirst
2006 FPR SSR PAC BLUE AUTOMATIC
Joined
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1,456 Posts
Well, we are dealing with a four wheel disc brake system on our SSRs and possibly most Fanatics second or third hobby vehicle may be as well, but older restorations with drum brakes are a slightly different story as there is actual fluid movement to actuate the shoes, but in general the same rules apply. First let it be said that modern brake rubber pressure hoses are a very good product. They have to meet FMVSS and SAE rules, look those up and you will find they are very exacting. They are generally not problematic on OEM brake systems and generally last a LONG time. A problem in high performance situations where immediate braking action is desired, as they age they tend to expand more(maybe fatigue of the reinforcing braid) and greater pedal movement is required for the same braking effect. But keep in mind on an ABS vehicle(most now-a-days) full deceleration braking is achieved by jamming the pedal to the limit and let the ABS controller modulate braking to all four wheels. As long as the hose doesn't rupture your good. Within limits neither inner diameter nor length affect braking. With our well engineered four wheel disc system pressure change, not fluid movement, modulates braking. With stainless there are three sizes in general usage, #4, the original most everyone, hot rod, drag or road-race & even circle track + contemporary aircraft used early on because it was commonly available. It has an approximate 3/16"ID. #3, available since WWII & before, became available in the surplus markets due to demand and when Aeroquip Corp introduced new product to market around 1978 you could get it new as well. It looked nicer by far and it's smaller ID, about 1/8"+, would transfer pressure more quickly through the same length of tubing, so aftermarket & OEM race parts suppliers started making special hose ends and adapters to satisfy the demand. The steel tubing in your braking system for discs is usually #3 hard tubing as well and I suspect factory rubber matches that closely. Formula One & purpose built racing vehicles have even used #2 with a tiny ID of about 1/16", used behind aircraft panels in the day to plumb instruments, but this was an extension of the speed of the pressure signal and beyond our needs. We seldom have to brake quickly from 200MPH+. At auto braking pressures stainless #3 or #4 undergoes no(0) expansion so our rule of braking effect is optimized over the life of the hose, infinite unless physically damaged, which can happen if they get kinked. That was a problem getting a DOT waiver for street car usage years back. Covering the stainless with extruded plastic, originally black & now in colors, plus codifying retention of the ends solved that. My own personal preference after all that, is to use original OEM rubber & if you think the pedal is spongy after 10 years or so, replace them. That said there is nothing intrinsically wrong with the stainless, if it floats your boat I would have gladly sold you a set up until about two years ago.
Master cylinder bore vs caliper piston size is a design parameter of the system and hose ID should have no effect unless you are designing a car from the ground up and a larger or smaller hose ID would be used throughout. We are only talking about 3' or so in total of our hydraulic system.
Most current aftermarket kits & replicas are #3 and that is what pics in the Forum look like, I didn't see @Dicktator 's.
WHEW, that was far longer than I planned and there is more, but hopefully this answers your query! o_O
Your knowledge is much appreciated
 

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Daily Driver
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8,958 Posts
WHEW, that was far longer than I planned and there is more, but hopefully this answers your query! o_O
If you type like I do at least 45 minutes but you covered the hows, whys, and what ifs, so we can all understand what damn few people can explain. Thanks for doing the work, you'll get your reward in heaven... or Tijuana. ;)
 

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76 Posts
I stock various aircraft hoses to support the fleet and I also have a Eaton cnc tube bender , Iam sure most auto hose shops can keep specs
 

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2005 Chevrolet SSR manual transmission
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605 Posts
My Stainless Brake Hose.

1. Hose on left, shows Stainless inside diameter is more than twice OEM.

Dicktator
If the stainless roll you've got is #3 then the what looks to be teflon or possibly nylon inner tube of the factory hose is #2 with several fabric braids and a rubber outer cover. Actually an impressive product and quite an improvement from the earlier rubber-fabric-rubber construction of brake hoses in the day. As I noted above, the ID of the hose has little effect on braking performance except maybe retraction, and since the factory hose has a rigid plastic inner tube it should show no expansion under pressure. Do the stainless for looks, but I truly can't see a braking performance improvement in the change. Proper bleeding of the system including the ABS will be your best bang for the buck in pedal feel if you have residual air in the system. For this you must use the Tech II or equivalent to purge the ABS.
$.02
 

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Here are mine Tso aircraft spec
Clear cove
Boeing polyester chafe cover
Psi test 6000

I will pull mine from a Ssr and advise

the key is two make a drawing and spec sheet to generate a spec for others

I also have a Eaton cnc tube bender for 304 stainless steel
Sizes 1/4 thru 1.5 tubing

my favorite is my 2.50 titanium exhaust pipes for aircraft, made to sample

589281
 

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Premium Member
2005 Chevrolet SSR manual transmission
Joined
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605 Posts
Here are mine Tso aircraft spec
Clear cove
Boeing polyester chafe cover
Psi test 6000

I will pull mine from a Ssr and advise

the key is two make a drawing and spec sheet to generate a spec for others

I also have a Eaton cnc tube bender for 304 stainless steel
Sizes 1/4 thru 1.5 tubing

my favorite is my 2.50 titanium exhaust pipes for aircraft, made to sample

View attachment 589281
Can not tell accurately from pic, but your hard stainless tubes look to be #3(3/16") which would exclude your tube bender. In my day we rarely bent the stainless 304 pickled and annealed .035 wall tubing. Left that task to the vehicle fabricators but if necessary could use a hand held bender, but it had to be right the first time and that is why the tubing had to be annealed. What wall thickness tubing are you using and what do you bend it with?
 

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1/4 .250
Flared
304
All hardlines are polished before the ship

larger hardline we create a jig to cross check bends , this is aircraft quality 304 s/s

The 3/4 hardline shown was nla, sells for 775.00 and we stock them
589282
589694
 

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507 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
Just drove home with the new Stainless Steel Brake Lines installed.
Wow! Perfect fit.
The Brakes are much firmer.
The Brakes pedal is much higher than before.
A completely different ride.
Well worth it in my opinion.
By the way, I only use Amsoil.
Here's a previous post regarding the Wildwood Master Cylinder:
 

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Discussion Starter #39
I spoke to Stoptech.
They do not fit the SSR.
I bought them and had to sell them at a discount.
Buyer beware.
 
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