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Has anyone had any luck polishing/buffing aggressively rear fender rock guards to eliminate partially or fully the chips??
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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My suggestion is sand them and repaint them. Then make sure you have running boards installed and mud flaps both front and rear. That is about the only way to protect them. Might want to check with a high-end body shop and see what they recommend.
 

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Ooo, you've got a black truck. It's a beautiful color but it shows imperfections more than other colors.

Two words... vinyl wrap.
 

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DFW TX Crew
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You cannot polish or buff out rock chips or those small indentions rocks can leave if they don't chip away the paint. Sanding and buffing will make it look better but you will still see all the chips and little pelts.

As mentioned have them repainted and put on some mud guards and clear protective film or the like.

First thing I did with my SSR was install some low profile subtle mud flaps.


Josh
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Ooo, you've got a black truck. It's a beautiful color but it shows imperfections more than other colors.

Two words... vinyl wrap.
Can't really vinyl wrap until the paint and surface is perfect. Then it might preserve it but folks here are saying the vinyl wrap gets chinks and nicks in it also.
 

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Can't really vinyl wrap until the paint and surface is perfect. Then it might preserve it but folks here are saying the vinyl wrap gets chinks and nicks in it also.
Augie, sorry to say but you and the "folks here" are incorrect.

The surface does not need to be "perfect" for a successful application. In fact, high quality vehicle wrap vinyl can hide many small imperfections.

There is a reason they are called "rock guards". They protect the fenders from abuse and road debris (duh). That said, any driven vehicle, regardless of whether it has mud flaps or running boards, will see wear on the rock guards to some degree.

You can paint them or wrap them and they will look great. Both will last a very long time on a garage queen. And both will show signs of wear on a driven vehicle. Take your pick.

How do I know this? I've been in business dealing with vinyls for over 10 years. I have an SSR and I have wrapped the rock guards on it. The wrapped rock guards have over 5000 miles on them and still look great.
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Augie, sorry to say but you and the "folks here" are incorrect.

The surface does not need to be "perfect" for a successful application. In fact, high quality vehicle wrap vinyl can hide many small imperfections.

There is a reason they are called "rock guards". The protect the fenders from abuse and road debris (duh). That said, any driven vehicle, regardless of whether it has mud flaps or running boards, will see wear on the rock guards to some degree.

You can paint them or wrap them and they will look great. Both will last a very long time on a garage queen. And both will show signs of wear on a driven vehicle. Take your pick.

How do I know this? I've been in business dealing with vinyls for over 10 years. I have an SSR and I have wrapped the rock guards on it. The wrapped rock guards have over 5000 miles on them and still look great.

I really like the look on yours but I assumed they were talking about the clear wrap where you could see the paint through it. My bad for assuming. I was thinking about doing some carbon fiber wrap on a few places on mine. Have you ever done mirrors? How hard are they?
 

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Augie, Personally I would not do a carbon fiber on the mirrors. Others might disagree. Here's why....
The mirrors have extreme compound curves. In order to wrap them, the vinyl must be stretched in some areas and shrunk in other areas. While this stretching and shrinking in itself is doable, it is very challenging.
The carbon fiber wrap film is not real carbon fiber. It is vinyl film that has been embossed with a carbon fiber grid to look like real carbon fiber. When you use it to wrap a piece that has such extreme compound curves as a mirror, the carbon fiber pattern gets very distorted. As such, the end result looks bad. It's visually stretched out in some areas and bunched up in others.
If you want to wrap the mirrors, fine. Use a film that does not have a pattern to it.
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Augie, Personally I would not do a carbon fiber on the mirrors. Others might disagree. Here's why....
The mirrors have extreme compound curves. In order to wrap them, the vinyl must be stretched in some areas and shrunk in other areas. While this stretching and shrinking in itself is doable, it is very challenging.
The carbon fiber wrap film is not real carbon fiber. It is vinyl film that has been embossed with a carbon fiber grid to look like real carbon fiber. When you use it to wrap a piece that has such extreme compound curves as a mirror, the carbon fiber pattern gets very distorted. As such, the end result looks bad. It's visually stretched out in some areas and bunched up in others.
If you want to wrap the mirrors, fine. Use a film that does not have a pattern to it.
Thanks for the advice. I thought that also.
 

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189 the LAST blur
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Augie, sorry to say but you and the "folks here" are incorrect.

The surface does not need to be "perfect" for a successful application. In fact, high quality vehicle wrap vinyl can hide many small imperfections.

There is a reason they are called "rock guards". The protect the fenders from abuse and road debris (duh). That said, any driven vehicle, regardless of whether it has mud flaps or running boards, will see wear on the rock guards to some degree.

You can paint them or wrap them and they will look great. Both will last a very long time on a garage queen. And both will show signs of wear on a driven vehicle. Take your pick.

How do I know this? I've been in business dealing with vinyls for over 10 years. I have an SSR and I have wrapped the rock guards on it. The wrapped rock guards have over 5000 miles on them and still look great.
Wizar,

What would be a reasonable cost to have a competent shop install protective covering over the existing guards on the rear fenders. This might work for me as the shiny black is just starting to dull down a bit even with the running boards. I don't want to do any painting and upset the paint originality at this point.
Thx Tom
 

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Hi Tom,

As Augie was pointing out in post #7, a clear protective film will show whatever is underneath it. Be sure the finish on your guards is to your liking before you go down that road.

You hit on a key point to all of this...a competent shop. The rock guards themselves have some compound curves and will require someone with experience to do it properly.

As for cost, prices vary widely. I wouldn't be surprised to see a range of $50 to $100 each. Maybe Josh will chime in here as I believe he deals in the application of protective films and may have a different take on it.

Also, if you haven't removed them from your truck (which you will need to do to have them properly wrapped) please know they are a bitch to take off. The adhesive tape GM used to hold them on is super strong stuff. It requires time and patients.

Hope that helps.
 

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DFW TX Crew
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To do the clear protective film (PPF) which is a urethane film not a vinyl just to clarify (very different films) I think I would charge around $75 per rear fender splash. It is a bit challenging to install but very doable once you learn it.

However I would not remove them if you're having the clear film put on as it requires some stretching and will need to be fixed to the vehicle to get that stretch right.

Ask the shop you're thinking of if they are using pre-cut kits or doing it all in bulk and hand trimming. The reason I tell you this is the kits will not look great since it needs to be stretched and the lines will not line up well all around and be very visible. I would have them installed with a bulk piece of film and have them trim it all the way to the outer edges as well as they possibly can. It will look much cleaner and show less lines.

Josh
 
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