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Genuinely SSR Obsessed
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I installed (SE) Mike's 5" stainless tips about 4 ((5?)) Years ago and I love them. They really fill the holes in the rear fascia. But I would like to get them to shine brighter. :surprise:

My question....what do y'all use to get a "chrome-like" shine on your tips and other underhood items?? Which products and tools do you recommend for stainless and chrome? What hand tools help with the polishing process?

images-17.jpeg
Anybody try this stuff? >:)




Thanks Fanatics. - :smile2:




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David :black:
images-31.jpeg
 

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I installed (SE) Mike's 5" stainless tips about 4 ((5?)) Years ago and I love them. They really fill the holes in the rear fascia. But I would like to get them to shine brighter. :surprise:

My question....what do y'all use to get a "chrome-like" shine on your tips and other underhood items?? Which products and tools do you recommend for stainless and chrome? What hand tools help with the polishing process?

View attachment 537351
Anybody try this stuff? >:)




Thanks Fanatics. - :smile2:




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David :black:
View attachment 537353
Hey David,
I polished out the stainless tips on my Z06 with rouge and a polishing ball, then followed with Simichrome. They look like chrome. I wipe them out most every drive with a cloth diaper (honest). I’ve done similar with Mike’s tips, but they really were very shiny when they arrived. I fully admit, I was going overboard and that I waxed my shocks before I put them on too. I further confess only occasionally wipe them out on Elsie, as she is tougher. I do “get after them” at bath time and occasionally hit them with bit of Simichrome. Simichrome is old school stuff, I suspect Mothers might do as well.

- Robert
:silver:
 

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Autosol metal polish is a bit more abrasive than Mothers, and more effective on stainless which is much harder than aluminum. It won't scratch stainless, but will leave some swirl marks on aluminum if you use it by hand.

I also use Autosol for the first pass at polishing all the under hood aluminum and wheels, but only if I am using my 3" air powered random orbital polisher/sander.

It was a $30 tool that you could probably buy at any major equipment supplier, like Harbour Freight. The go to supplier in Canada is Princess Auto for that kind of equipment.

It's a wonderful tool, and easy to work with, as long as you have an air source. I would imagine an equivalent AC powered tool would be a ton of money, if there is such a thing.
 

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David, I use rottenstone mixed with a bit of mineral oil to renew mirror polished stainless steel.
I have a container of it if you want to give it a try. Works better than any of the over the counter products. I learned this from a old fella that restored Rolls Royces back in the 70s.
Greg
 

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Hey David,
I polished out the stainless tips on my Z06 with rouge and a polishing ball, then followed with Simichrome. They look like chrome. I wipe them out most every drive with a cloth diaper (honest). I’ve done similar with Mike’s tips, but they really were very shiny when they arrived. I fully admit, I was going overboard and that I waxed my shocks before I put them on too. I further confess only occasionally wipe them out on Elsie, as she is tougher. I do “get after them” at bath time and occasionally hit them with bit of Simichrome. Simichrome is old school stuff, I suspect Mothers might do as well.

- Robert
:silver:
Jst when I had thought that Power Coating the Drive Shaft would be a bit too much....
This just confirms to me that there are others out there who think like I do......BUT..
It never crossed my mind about waxing the shocks,,,,
but then again...I power wash her bottom side about every 3-4 months..

Frank...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey David,
I polished out the stainless tips on my Z06 with rouge and a polishing ball, then followed with Simichrome. They look like chrome. I wipe them out most every drive with a cloth diaper (honest). I’ve done similar with Mike’s tips, but they really were very shiny when they arrived. I fully admit, I was going overboard and that I waxed my shocks before I put them on too. I further confess only occasionally wipe them out on Elsie, as she is tougher. I do “get after them” at bath time and occasionally hit them with bit of Simichrome. Simichrome is old school stuff, I suspect Mothers might do as well.

- Robert
:silver:
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WOW.....Robert, you are thorough!! After reading your post ((thx for the response)) I looked on Ebay for rouge and it listed rouge in about 5 or 6 different colors! Do the different colors represent different grades of abrasion??! - :willy: - Which color do you recommend?


Is the polishing ball a simple cloth ball used as a drill attachment? Appreciate all your help. - :cheers




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David :black:
2018-11-09-15-22-07--358173497.jpeg - "Bad Dogs!!!"
 

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Dave, go to PJ tool supply look up Jeweler's rouge and polishing compound it gives you a chart and color.
 

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In the last couple of years I started using a product called white diamond. I use it on stainless, chrome and aluminum. It’s a great polish available just about everywhere. Not only does it polish but has a sealant in it. Here’s an example of how well it works. Last year my buddy and I were cleaning our hot rods. I made the mistake of spraying a very strong cleaner degreaser on my aluminum wheels. It just about ruined my wheels. My buddy sprayed it on his aluminum wheels that he polishes regularly with the white diamond. They still shined like brand new. I use it regularly on my T-Bucket.
 

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In the last couple of years I started using a product called white diamond. I use it on stainless, chrome and aluminum. It’s a great polish available just about everywhere. Not only does it polish but has a sealant in it. Here’s an example of how well it works. Last year my buddy and I were cleaning our hot rods. I made the mistake of spraying a very strong cleaner degreaser on my aluminum wheels. It just about ruined my wheels. My buddy sprayed it on his aluminum wheels that he polishes regularly with the white diamond. They still shined like brand new. I use it regularly on my T-Bucket.
Gorgeous Bucket. I know you don't drive it as a daily driver, but have you had any problem with upper Radiator hose leaking.
 

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WOW.....Robert, you are thorough!! After reading your post ((thx for the response)) I looked on Ebay for rouge and it listed rouge in about 5 or 6 different colors! Do the different colors represent different grades of abrasion??! - :willy: - Which color do you recommend?


Is the polishing ball a simple cloth ball used as a drill attachment? Appreciate all your help. - :cheers




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David :black:
View attachment 537389 - "Bad Dogs!!!"
Green Rouge is used for final machine polishing of Stainless Steel.
You have no room for any type of polishing tool between the facia and the tips, that's why I recommended using Rottenstone and mineral oil and polishing by hand with a soft cotton cloth.
Rottenstone starts out about 2-3 microns but breaks down quickly with use into +/-0.5 micron grit (50,000 grit equivalent) which is finer that the best metal polishes available and it works by hand, do not machine polish with it.
Greg
 

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Wikipedia on rottenstone.

Rotten stone, sometimes spelled as rottenstone, also known as tripoli, is fine powdered porous rock used as a polishing abrasive for metalsmithing and in woodworking. It is usually weathered limestone mixed with diatomaceous, amorphous, or crystalline silica. It has similar applications to pumice, but it is generally sold as a finer powder and used for a more glossy polish after an initial treatment with coarser pumice powder. Tripoli particles are rounded rather than sharp, making it a milder abrasive.

It is usually mixed with oil, sometimes water, and rubbed on the surface of varnished or lacquered wood with a felt pad or cloth. Rotten stone is sometimes used to buff stains out of wood. Some polishing waxes contain powdered rotten stone in a paste substrate. For larger polishing jobs, rotten stone mixed with a binder is applied to polishing wheels.

It has also been used to polish brass, such as that found on military uniforms, as well as steel and other metals. Plates used in daguerreotypes were polished using rotten stone, the finest abrasive available at the time.

It is also used to polish jewelry and in toothpastes.
 

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WOW.....Robert, you are thorough!! After reading your post ((thx for the response)) I looked on Ebay for rouge and it listed rouge in about 5 or 6 different colors! Do the different colors represent different grades of abrasion??! - :willy: - Which color do you recommend?


Is the polishing ball a simple cloth ball used as a drill attachment? Appreciate all your help. - :cheers




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David :black:
View attachment 537389 - "Bad Dogs!!!"
Yes the polishing attachment is a simple cloth one that attaches to a drill, or air grinder. I think I most recently got one from Harbor Frieght, in Pearland. I’d bet they have the rouge there too. The rouge colors are for different metals and have different levels of abrasive material. For really deteriorated or unpolished metal, like my Z06 tips were, I started with brown, then transitioned to green and finished with Simichrome. I’d bet you could start with green on your tips. You can use one polishing attachment and fluff it in between different rouges. It doesn’t take much rouge, but you do have to start with a clean surface. Otherwise the contaminants can scratch the surface and then you get to spend more time to polish out those deeper scratches.

Here is a link to a nice description of the various colors:
https://blog.esslinger.com/guide-to-buffing-compounds-and-their-uses/

As I was once told, the more time and effort you spend on polishing, the better your results will be.

- Robert
:silver:

P.S. Less you think I skipped a step on my shocks, I polished them and then waxed them. :wink2:
P.P.S. Now I see I need to touch mine up
 

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From reading the rottenstone seems to be essentially Tripoli, brown rouge or finer, suspended in mineral oil. Sounds like handy stuff. Thanks @Texasbaehr for the tip, and enjoyed working with you in Dallas.

And yeah, there is no room for a polishing device, other than my finger tips and a cloth between the facsia and the tips. That said, they don’t need heavy polishing.

Now, back to tending the turkey fryin’.

Happy Thanksgiving all!

-Robert
:silver:
 

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Hey Warrior,
I'm a new guy here but have been playing with paints, metals and gel coat for many years. The best product I have found for a polish is FLITZ. I even tried it on the exterior leading edge of my enclosed trailer where it transitions from front wall to roof. That was gelcoated BLACK over fiberglass that had turned cloudy white. About 20 minutes of polishing with FLITZ it was shiny black again. I use it on my Electra-Glide all the time, and the aluminum wheels on my Van.
calook1967
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks to everyone for their helpful responses. So many good product choices to try that I'm going to subscribe to this thread so that I can save all the helpful directions! - :smile2:

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I especially appreciate the detail you included. You Fanatics rule!!




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David :black:
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