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I have been trying to find small touch up kit for my redline SSR. All the sites that I go to say it is torch red. Is redline just another name for torch red?
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Go to internet under Dr Color Chip. They make a kit by your cars paint number and it fills in the chips perfectly and they give you a liquid to wipe off the excess. I did my whole SSR this past winter and you can hardly find any of the chips. You wipe off all the excess and the paint only stays in the chip. Good luck.

Dr. Color Chip
https://www.drcolorchip.com/demo/videos.php
 

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I have been trying to find small touch up kit for my redline SSR. All the sites that I go to say it is torch red. Is redline just another name for torch red?
Yes !!! cincyssr stay tuned to this channel, it is better than HGTV. Years ago when I first got our SSR, I noted on here it overheated in the Homecoming parade at Middle Tennessee State.

Overheating problem solved immediately by SSRfanatic in Texas ... stay out of those "damn" parades !!! :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: "works every time" :smile2: :smile2: :smile2:

See ya' in a couple of weeks here in Murfreesboro at the Tennessee State Rally !!! tennesseecozydog :ssr
 

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Thanks everyone

t-dog Yep I am loving it here. Really looking forward to coming to Tennessee to my first rally.
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Here are the codes.
Did some research awhile back and came up with this.

Color Name.............Order Code................Touch up Paint Code

Aqua Blur......................26U...........................WA-214M
Smokin Asphalt..............41U...........................WA-8555
Ricochet Silver...............67U............................WA-994L
Redline Red....................70U............................WA-9075
Slingshot Yellow.............79U............................WA-423G
Sorry guys..took a little more digging but I found it:

Ultraviolet......................21U.............................WA-245E

Hope that helps.
_________________
 

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Here is something interesting. I had paint mixed under 9075 Torch Red and it came out darker. Went back and second mix was spot on. I mentioned this to Oldfatguy and said he was told there is 2 variations of 9075 torch red.
 

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Enjoying life as it comes
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Here is something interesting. I had paint mixed under 9075 Torch Red and it came out darker. Went back and second mix was spot on. I mentioned this to Oldfatguy and said he was told there is 2 variations of 9075 torch red.
Variations and variables yes. But for the Torch red, NO. Only one formula and it recommends a white base.undercoat to achieve the correct brightness and tone of top color.

If it was a darker torch red they may have mixed the wrong Red. Victory red is darker where torch red is more orange. Or they added a little too much Quindo violet (almost purple color) in the mix. Per 459 units (1 pint) there are only 4 units of Quindo violet. The majority (186 units) is Scarlet red (bright red). The rest (bright yellow, white, black) are minor drops (less then 2 units each) as well the rest is base binder.

When our formulas come up on the computer they will show us if there are field formulas based on real world shops trying to match colors. Some of them help while other's are just a shot in the wind. One help I have is a color standards program that has every color and it's variables, so if the original prime formula doesn't match (usually does unless it's been resprayed by someone) then we rely on the field formula variables. Sometimes there's only 1 and other times there are 10 or more. I can take that small chip book and lay it one the panel being repaired or next to it that will be matched, and hopefully at least one of them matches or is close enough to tint or blend out to give the illusion of matching.

Something to keep in mind is the difference a color will appear over various base/undercoats. This is called metamerizm. For example:
White base............. torch red= very bright red
Black base..............torch red= darker, dirtier look
Gray base...............torch red= bluer, dirtier
Yellow base.............torch red= more orange
Blue base................torch red= darker, bluer

So, you can see how the undercoat can change the appearance of the topcoat even if the paint used was form the same can.


Hope this helps to understand some of the things us painter's go through to achieve those color matches for everyone.

The difference between a Painter and Sprayer:
PAINTER:A good painter will be able to see and adjust as he goes to achieve the correct color.

SPRAYER: Will simply spray the color and call it good or blame it on something else.
 

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Thanks, Very informative. Sounds like a little extra drop of this and a little extra drop that can really change the color. Bottom line leave it to the professionals. My problem was I got a pint about a year-and-a-half ago to paint my wheels, it matched perfectly got a pint last month same paint code it didn't match.
 

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Hey Painter ---- Any specifics on the white base coat for Torch Red applications? How many coats of color and how many coats of clear on a set of original Satin painted wheels, for best results??
 

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Fascinating details on what a painter has to go through to get colors right.

I have always had a problem with the black on my two-tone. I like doing car shows on cloudy days, or look for trees to be in the shade on sunny days. On really bright days, the direction changes on the body, and the door edge and door frames have a very bronze look. I always assumed I got a crappy paint job from the factory, and that what I'm seeing is the primer showing through. I went after GM for a complete repaint, but soon realized the number of issues that might create down the road with seals and/or overspray, and decided to live with the crappy paint job.

Am I right about the black paint being too thin?

Also, on a 2-tone, a painter needs to have a tiny amount of intelligence to do the job right. I took the front valence, the two rear fender protectors, and the new front airdam in to my Chevy dealership to be painted while I was doing the supercharger install. When I went back to pick them up, I told the receptionist those weren't my parts, because these were silver, and mine were black when they came in.

Yup - the sprayer went with the upper paint code 67U instead of the 41L for lower.:banghead:banghead

They were not happy about having to re-do the pieces, and now if I ever get a rock chip, I'm not happy that it's a nice shiny silver instead of black. Dumbass!!!!
 

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Enjoying life as it comes
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Fascinating details on what a painter has to go through to get colors right.

I have always had a problem with the black on my two-tone. I like doing car shows on cloudy days, or look for trees to be in the shade on sunny days. On really bright days, the direction changes on the body, and the door edge and door frames have a very bronze look. I always assumed I got a crappy paint job from the factory, and that what I'm seeing is the primer showing through. I went after GM for a complete repaint, but soon realized the number of issues that might create down the road with seals and/or overspray, and decided to live with the crappy paint job.

Am I right about the black paint being too thin?

Also, on a 2-tone, a painter needs to have a tiny amount of intelligence to do the job right. I took the front valence, the two rear fender protectors, and the new front airdam in to my Chevy dealership to be painted while I was doing the supercharger install. When I went back to pick them up, I told the receptionist those weren't my parts, because these were silver, and mine were black when they came in.

Yup - the sprayer went with the upper paint code 67U instead of the 41L for lower.:banghead:banghead

They were not happy about having to re-do the pieces, and now if I ever get a rock chip, I'm not happy that it's a nice shiny silver instead of black. Dumbass!!!!
Flash,

Yep I know what you're talking about. Seen it happen a few times.

The black is a strange creature as there are 165 different blacks. All the colors nowadays are sprayed very thin on the cars, That's where the factory found out they can spray a certain undercoat to achieve maximum brightness or certain tones with each color. Unfortunately the place that paints and delivers the bumper covers to the factory isn't on the same page as the factory painting.

"Redride Hey Painter ---- Any specifics on the white base coat for Torch Red applications? How many coats of color and how many coats of clear on a set of original Satin painted wheels, for best results??"

The white base is a about as bright as you can get. They use a strong white with only drops of blue and black. The paint shop can mix up the undercoat for you if you ask them too. It's great for whole panels, but gets tricky when blending out a panel. natural laws tell you not to spray white on a red panel and then red again attempting to cover it just enough to match. For a professional, if done correctly, it's called giving the illusion of a perfect match. A good painter can achieve that process , but a sprayer will mess it up 90% of the time and blame it on something else.

The wheels also use a white base, 3 coats of tarnished silver, and 2-3 coats of clear. The reason for 2-3 is that if they look great after 2 coats? Quit while you're ahead. If there's a dull area or two then apply the 3rd coat of clear. You can adjust the amount of gloss you want by controlling the way you spray the clear on. It gets technical after that and would be better to show the process in person than to explain it as you have to actually watch how it flows out and onto the wheels..
 

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Fuzzy....

Meant to say red wheels for the Redride. I will assume 3 coats of 9075 Red color over the white base coat, and then 2-3 coats of clear for my wheels unless you post different. Thanks for the info.
 

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Fuzzy....

Meant to say red wheels for the Redride. I will assume 3 coats of 9075 Red color over the white base coat, and then 2-3 coats of clear for my wheels unless you post different. Thanks for the info.
You are correct.

Spray on medium wet coats of color from various angles for proper coverage, and the clear you need to watch as you apply it (you can actually see the clear flow out as it lands on the surface). 1st coat is a quick mist coat to create a tacky surface, then wait 10-15 minutes to flash (set up and allow solvents to dissipate. You should be able to lightly touch a surface next to the painted wheel (or an unseen surface) and pull your finger away without stringing the clear), second coat is applied heavier (medium wet) and evenly from various angles to get the nooks and crannies. It should be just wet enough to be uniformly smooth, but not too wet where it will run. If you need that 3rd coat after the flash time, apply it the same way as the 2nd coat.

If you're unsure of applying the medium wet coats of clear for fear of runs, you can do a second method. Hold the gun back about 12-14 inches and apply a continual lighter misting coat several times from all angles until there are no dry areas. Do not apply medium wet coats this way or it will run for sure.

It take a special eye and technique to achieve the uniform finish (and lots of practice). Take your time. The worst that can happen is you get a run and may have to sand it out and re shoot one, but you'll have gained knowledge on what not to do next time.

I'll send you a pm with my number if you have any other questions.
 

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Daily Driver
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I remember BLACKIE repainting his truck because it looked brownish in direct Sun. He used a different black than the SSR paint code to get a true black.
 
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