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I have an 04 with the 5.3 auto. what is the best spark plugs to run? Im getting ready to do a tune up with plugs and wires. I was looking at champion iridiums.
 

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'06 FPR Smokin Asphalt; '04 Ulta Violet
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@Dcramer, Plugs are probably more of a personal choice. There are a lot of threads on the subject. Have you tried the search box in the top banner? ALSO--Consider clicking on the Colored Letter/Picture, top far right corner, go down to "Account Settings", click, and fill in your information. Especially your LOCATION and the year of your SSR, like the rest of us. Then go the the left side and click on "Signature". Also put the year of your SSR in your "Signature", and anything else you want to show in your posts, and we can help you better if you have a problem. When you finish click the "SAVE" box.

Click here for the "How To Library" OneDrive

Also click on this link and go to Post #1 Help Us Help You---UPDATE

Nick & Kathy
 

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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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I have an 04 with the 5.3 auto. what is the best spark plugs to run? Im getting ready to do a tune up with plugs and wires. I was looking at champion iridiums.
NGK TR6 is what we tend to run with superchargers, and we change them anywhere from 5K to 15K miles depending on “how hard we run them”. The iridium version are the TR6IX, and I know at least one person that is running them.

Plug wires are another story… I’ll say this, the “truck“ LS spark plug wires are too long. The #2 wire will rest and rub on the frame as the engine sits offset to the right in the frame. You will need the ”car” LS plug wires. I’ve tried some wire sets and returned them and run some others. I run the Granatelli plug wires on both our Rs and like them a lot.
 

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:unsure:
Given the vast improvement in car/truck ignition systems over the last many years, plug replacement is no longer a "high maintenance" deal like it was way back when we did them routinely along with points/condenser and a new rotor cap.
So my thoughts on how long you can reasonably go before really needing to swap them out is much closer to Dictators comments than yours with a super charger.

Can you elaborate on just what it is that causes a super charged engine to "eat up" spark plugs creating a replacement need "anywhere from 5k to 15k" intervals. Just curious.
 

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2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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:unsure:
Given the vast improvement in car/truck ignition systems over the last many years, plug replacement is no longer a "high maintenance" deal like it was way back when we did them routinely along with points/condenser and a new rotor cap.
So my thoughts on how long you can reasonably go before really needing to swap them out is much closer to Dictators comments than yours with a super charger.

Can you elaborate on just what it is that causes a super charged engine to "eat up" spark plugs creating a replacement need "anywhere from 5k to 15k" intervals. Just curious.
You're right. Back in the day the ignition systems had several mechanical areas that degraded with use (or corrosion), cap, rotor, points and spark plugs. Each time a spark is generated with any electrode there is wear. The ignitions on our LS's are controlled by the computer, so there are no moving parts and the ECU sends a signal to each coil telling it to fire at the proper time and length, etc. Roughly speaking, the modern spark plugs are all about longevity and spark under normal engine conditions, hence precious metals are used to reduce degradation of the spark plug and the tips get smaller and sharper, or more edges like the E3s, etc. The use of precious metals reduces the normal wear that occurs with each spark. Unfortunately those spark plugs do not work so well under boosted applications and tuners will step back to the more efficient copper spark plugs, generally TR6s, which naturally have better heat dissipation characteristics as well. Unfortunately the copper plugs wear out faster. Among many other things like low resistance plug wires. the spark plug gap is key under boosted applications. When the gap gets too large under higher boost, the incoming air can actually blow out the spark and the engine will miss. A quick inspection and change of the plugs and we're off and flying again.

If we're talking about non-boosted applications, I'm with Dicktator and change them at some long interval, or when necessary.
 

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You're right. Back in the day the ignition systems had several mechanical areas that degraded with use (or corrosion), cap, rotor, points and spark plugs. Each time a spark is generated with any electrode there is wear. The ignitions on our LS's are controlled by the computer, so there are no moving parts and the ECU sends a signal to each coil telling it to fire at the proper time and length, etc. Roughly speaking, the modern spark plugs are all about longevity and spark under normal engine conditions, hence precious metals are used to reduce degradation of the spark plug and the tips get smaller and sharper, or more edges like the E3s, etc. The use of precious metals reduces the normal wear that occurs with each spark. Unfortunately those spark plugs do not work so well under boosted applications and tuners will step back to the more efficient copper spark plugs, generally TR6s, which naturally have better heat dissipation characteristics as well. Unfortunately the copper plugs wear out faster. Among many other things like low resistance plug wires. the spark plug gap is key under boosted applications. When the gap gets too large under higher boost, the incoming air can actually blow out the spark and the engine will miss. A quick inspection and change of the plugs and we're off and flying again.

If we're talking about non-boosted applications, I'm with Dicktator and change them at some long interval, or when necessary.
(y)
 

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Ours has a Joe Delano engine performance tune and Joe also recommended the NGK 4177 TR6 spark plugs (even though I'm part of the great unwashed without a supercharger :p ). They'll need to be changed about every 10K miles or so, but for as little as we get to drive it these days, that'll take a few years.

Granatelli plug wires are the gold standard, but I couldn't justify the cost for my driving habits, so went with ACDelco 9748RR Spark Plug Wires. They're the correct length for the SSR.

Runs great!
 

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2004 Slingshot Yellow
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I bought the NGK plugs from Rock Auto. Now if I can only get the boots off the plugs. I’ve already spent an hour trying to pull several of them and they won’t budge. I threw in the towel. will try again when my hands heal LOL
 

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I bought the NGK plugs from Rock Auto. Now if I can only get the boots off the plugs. I’ve already spent an hour trying to pull several of them and they won’t budge. I threw in the towel. will try again when my hands heal LOL
Been there, done that with the OEM plugs and wires. Cuss jar was full. Made sure to use anti-seize on the new plugs and dielectric grease on the new wires.

Hang in there!
 
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