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Analysis.

You can get a higher flow volume filter. K&N is one that comes to mind.

I would use a full synthetic oil. There are various ones out there. I use Royal Purple HMX 5W - 30 and add an extra quart.

I have had various engines do better on different oils. Also, the oil packages change to meet the newer specs.

10 minutes seems a bit long for a start up slap, but if it does clear up I would certainly look for a reason the oil is up to snuff early.

A used oil test may point you in a different direction.

I agree with trying oils and viscosity and filter and I would also have the used oil analyzed.

Dave
 

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Slingshot Rules!
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Interesting, Nick . . . a "Synthetic Blend?"

Definitely no expert here but I was trained from day one to "go by the book" whenever vehicle maintenance is involved.

As for The Doophus . . . the book clearly states FULL SYNTHETIC as do the local Chevy Dealer's Service Representatives. Never a mention of a blend. Also, only Shell V-Power Premium when it comes time for fuel.

Knock on wood . . . so far no racket and/or any other loud engine noises in over 12 years.
 

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2004 Slingshot Yellow
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Here's a link on LS1 forum with an explanation from a GM engineer.

https://ls1tech.com/forums/generation-iii-internal-engine/372791-piston-slap-explaination-gm-engineer.html

And BTW NEVER use a petroleum oil or synthetic blend in these LS engines, only full synthetic oil should be used. Fossil oil and blends will not maintain viscosity through full temperature range and that gets worse as miles increase between changes.
Synthetics are made from natural gas and NGLs not crude oil so the base oil is pure without the paraffins, carbon, metals and dozens of other molecules in fossil oil. So buy any full synthetic you want that's on sale, they are all the same except for the detergents and proprietary additives eAch company adds.
For the driving 99% of us do there is no difference in any of the full synthetic oils other than marketing $.
Greg
 

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Styles Sport Roadster
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Years ago I had a noise that sounded like a lifter making a noise dealer tore it down #one piston wall was scared engine was replaced at 30 thousand miles . no cost to me . I always use mobile 1 and a good oil filter .
 

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If it's a garage queen, and not driven for a while you'll get some oil drain from the lifters on first start up especially in winter. It should go away once the engine is warmed up. If you drive it more on a daily basis you shouldn't get very much lifter noise as the oil will stay in the lifters. Get a long screw driver and hold the handle up to your ear while touching the blade to different spots on the engine to get a better idea where the noise is coming from, or get a mechanics stethoscope and do the same. Hopefully the noise will be from the valve train and not the oil pan. Oil pan noise could be bearings, side of block ...piston slap, if it goes away when it warms up I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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Thank you so much, I'm going to change the oil and the filter and go from there.
That is a good place to start. Run it a couple hundred miles and do it again. Good luck.
 
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Cold start piston slap is common in the 5.3L and 6.0L. Whether an LM4, LS2 or the cast iron full size truck engines.
GM states this is several bulletins over years.
One member has over 220k miles SSR on his 2003, and the piston slap is consistent, even when warm. It still runs fine, just sounds like a knock.
Unless you frequently do 6000 RPM shifts, I would not be too concerned.
As suggested, dump the semi-synthetic (NOT correct oil for the LS2) and put in 7 quarts of a good FULL synthetic Mobile 1 or AMSOIL, or Royal Purple and a high quality filter.
Check the oil level ever 1000 miles ( 2005 LS2's sometimes have vanishing oil issues)
Drop the top, and enjoy. :smile2:
Who else runs 7 quarts of oil? I’m running 5w30 synthetic in mine, slight engine slap at start up but goes away when warm. Oil dipstick shows half between the markings. Do I add?
 

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BAD BOW TIE
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I have been convinced and run mine over full a little less then a quart. All folks here seem to recommend it because of stock oil pan design and the slosh affect. I use the Mobil 1 oil filter and Mobil 1 synthetic oil only.
 
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One of the SoCal Nuts
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I have been convinced and run mine over full a little less then a quart. All folks here seem to recommend it because of stock oil pan design and the slosh affect. I use the Mobil 1 oil filter and Mobil 1 synthetic oil only.
I am with Auggie I have been running 7 quarts since I got the truck in 9/06 based on information I received from Fanatics. Dealer never argued with me and I have had no engine trouble in 275K miles.
 

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2005 Chevrolet SSR manual transmission
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Most fanatics + other vehicle owners of the last few decades have probably never experienced the sound of piston slap in most modern vehicles. My '05 SSR has it to a degree when cold (105K miles) but it clears up & is entirely gone after a thorough warm up drive time which varies depending on ambient temp. I had a previous experience though, thus my casual attitude. I owned a 409HP, 409CI '62 Impala SS back in the '60s. These engines had forged aluminum pistons with no wristpin offset, rare in a production engine, and that with a lot of skirt clearance needed with a forged unit + the solid lifter camshaft and the engine was a cacophony of sound, particularly during warmup. I got used to it and did not find it objectionable, something to listen to when the AM radio would not pick up a station. Bought the car with 50K+ miles on it and sold it at about 140K. Keep in mind this thing had no overdrive and came with a 4.11 gear which was changed to a 4.56 when the pinion bearing failed so the engine fairly wailed on an Interstate trip. Never had a bearing issue, but it did have a bunch of bent pushrods when I got it from a severe over-rev.
Tuckerred1948
 

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Interesting reading. I had my LS2 rebuilt with a lot of good parts over a year ago. At the recommendation of the engine rebuilder, I ran Lucas 10-30 Hot Rod oil, which is a fossil oil with high zinc content for the break-in. He told me the new engine would be a bit louder because of the shorter skirts on the Wiseco pistons. Didn't really notice a difference.

Did an oil change at 500 miles, and another this spring at roughly 3500 miles.

Switched to Mobil 1 5-30, stayed with the Mobil 1 filter and the 7 qt fill-up. The engine is definitely a bit louder with Mobil 1, but nothing dramatic. It quiets down nicely after a few minutes.
 
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Most fanatics + other vehicle owners of the last few decades have probably never experienced the sound of piston slap in most modern vehicles. My '05 SSR has it to a degree when cold (105K miles) but it clears up & is entirely gone after a thorough warm up drive time which varies depending on ambient temp. I had a previous experience though, thus my casual attitude. I owned a 409HP, 409CI '62 Impala SS back in the '60s. These engines had forged aluminum pistons with no wristpin offset, rare in a production engine, and that with a lot of skirt clearance needed with a forged unit + the solid lifter camshaft and the engine was a cacophony of sound, particularly during warmup. I got used to it and did not find it objectionable, something to listen to when the AM radio would not pick up a station. Bought the car with 50K+ miles on it and sold it at about 140K. Keep in mind this thing had no overdrive and came with a 4.11 gear which was changed to a 4.56 when the pinion bearing failed so the engine fairly wailed on an Interstate trip. Never had a bearing issue, but it did have a bunch of bent pushrods when I got it from a severe over-rev.
Tuckerred1948
A tip of my cap to you, Sir! Not many people are aware of wrist pin offset in an engine. When I started building competition engines in the early 70s, the trick for a few free hp was to install the pistons reversed, so the offset was opposite the thrust wall. I'd always warn the customer that the arrows/dots on the piston crown would be pointing in the wrong direction. I'd also warn them that significant warm up time was needed, before standing on the loud pedal. My recommendation was also to install an oil temp gauge! Oil temp lags way behind water temp and is very critical to engine performance/health. I always like to see at least 160* oil temp before aggressively running an engine. It may take 15 - 20 minutes of run time to get to that threshold!

The LS piston slap issue can certainly be annoying, as it's a random issue. GM got away from fitting pistons to bores in their production engines, so it's just the luck of the draw. If you end up with several holes with small pistons in large bores, you'll have a noisy engine on start up.
 
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