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I just googled "Dictator's SSr front end alignment numbers and specs", as Aggie Doggie suggested, & I came up with nothing ??
I don't know this little trick for a better alignment over factory specs, so if JustDolt2004 doesn't know this good info being giving here on the Fanatic, & tries to google it as I did, he or she will be clueless too ??
Rick.
Dicktator's front end alignment specs:
  • Caster (L-R) 4.25 +/- 0.5 Set to max and equal both sides
  • Cross Caster (L-R) 0.0 +/- 0.3
  • Camber* 0.00 +/- 0.5
  • Cross Camber (L-R) 0.00
  • Total Toe* 0.00 +/- 0.2
  • *Zero Camber, Zero Toe - as Close to ZERO as possible on NEGATIVE side
  • Steering Wheel Angle 0.50 3.50
 

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Daily Driver
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I just googled "Dictator's SSr front end alignment numbers and specs", as Aggie Doggie suggested, & I came up with nothing ??
I don't know this little trick for a better alignment over factory specs, so if JustDolt2004 doesn't know this good info being giving here on the Fanatic, & tries to google it as I did, he or she will be clueless too ??
Rick.
These are the specs as found here... https://onedrive.live.com/?cid=3EF39D9F5ADCE5E5&id=3EF39D9F5ADCE5E5!1491&parId=3EF39D9F5ADCE5E5!853&o=OneUp
 

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Thanks, the steering also becomes very sloppy loose above 60. Is this another issue?
I have a 2005 and have been plagued with the same issue, especially when I hit uneven payment, pot hole or the like at 55-60 mph. I tried all the things others have noted without success. A front end shop noticed my sway bar bushings were shot. I ordered replacements from 2 or 3 suppliers -which didn't fit!!??? After pondering that a bit, I went back to the outfit that I bought a stiffer sway bar from. Once their bushings were installed, things got better- but not perfect. Eventually, another shop found some loose bolts elsewhere in my front suspension (I don't remember where and can't find the bill). Currently. it seems to have done the trick.
 

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Something to keep in mind on not just the SSR but most newer vehicles, are that most front end suspension parts are no longer built with grease fittings on them. So the grease put in when the parts are built is all they have. After years of use and being beat around from suspension travel, that grease works away from the surfaces that it is there to protect and lubricate. What happens then is wear. It used to be you could hit them with the trusty grease gun and keep some of the play out of the system and have parts last longer. Now they are going to wear the grease out of the joints and have metal to metal sooner. Sway bars mount bushings are made with a heavy duty plastic and they both get hard and wear as well. The sway bar end links again are not grease-able so they wear faster as well. Many front end parts can look good from the outside but the inner parts can be wearing out due to the lack of lubrication.

just some food for thought here
 

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Something to keep in mind on not just the SSR but most newer vehicles, are that most front end suspension parts are no longer built with grease fittings on them. So the grease put in when the parts are built is all they have. After years of use and being beat around from suspension travel, that grease works away from the surfaces that it is there to protect and lubricate. What happens then is wear. It used to be you could hit them with the trusty grease gun and keep some of the play out of the system and have parts last longer. Now they are going to wear the grease out of the joints and have metal to metal sooner. Sway bars mount bushings are made with a heavy duty plastic and they both get hard and wear as well. The sway bar end links again are not grease-able so they wear faster as well. Many front end parts can look good from the outside but the inner parts can be wearing out due to the lack of lubrication.

just some food for thought here
:rolleyes:

Check out this option......

 

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Just my opinion, but I think I would leave the ball joint alone before I would do either one of those suggestions. The first is only adding grease to the top side and in the boot. Plus I would be concerned the added hole is more likely to cause failure sooner. The second has more wrong than right from a common sense stand point. Drilling and introducing metal shavings into the ball joint is not a good idea. If you are replacing the ball joints, why would you not just buy ones with grease fittings included? His theory of the metal rings securing the boots also doesn't hold much logic either. The boot is trapped between the control arm and spindle so they aren't going anywhere. Allowing the boot to move to the top of the travel is allowing that shaft to be fully lubricated. Most ball and socket applications with grease fittings are designed to push the old grease from the bottom to the top and have a grease strain relief at the top. I would rather buy the new one with the fitting already designed into it. Plus companies like Moog spend a lot of money and research time engineering this stuff to work better then Google hack guys do.
 

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I just googled "Dictator's SSr front end alignment numbers and specs", as Aggie Doggie suggested, & I came up with nothing ??
I don't know this little trick for a better alignment over factory specs, so if JustDolt2004 doesn't know this good info being giving here on the Fanatic, & tries to google it as I did, he or she will be clueless too ??
Rick.
here it is Rick
Alignment Specs.


Caster 4.25 +/- 0.5 Set to max and equal both sides
Cross Caster 0.0 +/- 0.3
Camber -0.5 +/- 0.5
(CHANGE CAMBER TO ZERO (0)
Toe +0.1 +/- 0.2
(CHANGE TOE TO ZERO (0) Change Camber to 0 and change Toe to 0 to eliminate inner scuffing.
Wheel lug nut torque 110 lbs MAXIMUM.

 

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Just my opinion, but I think I would leave the ball joint alone before I would do either one of those suggestions. The first is only adding grease to the top side and in the boot. Plus I would be concerned the added hole is more likely to cause failure sooner. The second has more wrong than right from a common sense stand point. Drilling and introducing metal shavings into the ball joint is not a good idea. If you are replacing the ball joints, why would you not just buy ones with grease fittings included? His theory of the metal rings securing the boots also doesn't hold much logic either. The boot is trapped between the control arm and spindle so they aren't going anywhere. Allowing the boot to move to the top of the travel is allowing that shaft to be fully lubricated. Most ball and socket applications with grease fittings are designed to push the old grease from the bottom to the top and have a grease strain relief at the top. I would rather buy the new one with the fitting already designed into it. Plus companies like Moog spend a lot of money and research time engineering this stuff to work better then Google hack guys do.
:)

I kinda thought you might have that reaction. I Googled and found those videos as a result of your pointing out that most current joints were no longer supplied with grease fittings. I just knew that there had to be someone or more that had to come up with an alternative.

As to cost, in the video the guy said the (non grease fitted) joints were around $14 or so and those with fittings were more like $34-35 worth. So he obviously was trying to save money but his (time and labor) as I could see it........offset any savings there.

I agree that the drilling and tapping would lead to some metal shavings inside the joint and while the impact (in my opinion) would be very minimal, it is indeed a valid concern.

I'm not sure just how (Youtube) videos work, but I think I have heard that some can get (paid) for the "hits" that their video gets..........I kinda think this guy was one of those.;)
 
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