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MY greatest fear in owning my SSR is having a problem with those top cylinders. This concern and a few recent posts regarding driving my truck in winter leads me to a question. There is probably no definitive evidence either way but I am sure there are opinons about this. Does the temp. affect the life of those cylinders? Today it is ZERO here in Mo. with a wind chill as low as 20 below. Even in my unheated garage my truck is probably sitting at 30 degrees today. In the summer if sitting in the sun at a car show or I have driven it to work on a pretty day the top compartment is well over 100 inside. Do you think the extreme heat or extreme cold either one adversely effects the life of the cylinders? I know they are not the same, but I have tractors that suffer the cold and heat year after year and the cylinders don't seem to be effected from the heat or cold. What say you?
 

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Cylinders.

Click on this link. It will give you information on how to remove & replace top cylinders and who to send them to be rebuilt. Cost about $1000 plus shipping to have them rebuilt better than new and you are good for another 10 to 15 years because they put in an extra seal. https://onedrive.live.com/?id=3EF39D9F5ADCE5E5!853&cid=3EF39D9F5ADCE5E5 Scroll down to "Roof Cylinder Removal". Gives you step by step instructions with pictures.
The best preventative measure that you can take is to replace the lift struts. If the struts are weak (they are supposed to support 160# each), but as they weaken less support as the top goes down resulting in a pressure spike in the system. The 2 large top lift cylinders do the most work and have the largest cross sectional area and are usually the first to fail.

It takes about 30 minutes to change them if you have never done it before, 25 minutes for the first one, 5 minutes for the second. Here is a link to purchase them. Simple Engineering

Jack
 

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Cantankerous SSR CaretakR
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MY greatest fear in owning my SSR is having a problem with those top cylinders. This concern and a few recent posts regarding driving my truck in winter leads me to a question. There is probably no definitive evidence either way but I am sure there are opinons about this. Does the temp. affect the life of those cylinders? Today it is ZERO here in Mo. with a wind chill as low as 20 below. Even in my unheated garage my truck is probably sitting at 30 degrees today. In the summer if sitting in the sun at a car show or I have driven it to work on a pretty day the top compartment is well over 100 inside. Do you think the extreme heat or extreme cold either one adversely effects the life of the cylinders? I know they are not the same, but I have tractors that suffer the cold and heat year after year and the cylinders don't seem to be effected from the heat or cold. What say you?
There is a thermistor on the roof hydraulic pump assembly. On the 03-04 SSR's, the temperature was monitored by the RDM and would suspend operation of the top if the temperature of the pump motor was outside the designed range. On the 05-06 R's this circuit was no longer used nor monitored by the RDM. The operating range was -50*F to 212*F. Note this is actual (essentially ambient) temperature of the motor, not wind chill as this is not relevant here except for how fast the truck/pump will cool off as heat is drawn away, heat index does not apply either. On them slow Black R's, I could potentially see getting to the 212* limit in the stowage compartment if parked in the direct sun in the middle of AZ NV heat. Cold limit maybe if in Northern Canada or Alaska. That being said, having had to deal with servo hydraulic vibrators in very cold temps, those "very" cold temps could potentially put undue stress on the SSR hydraulics due to changes in fluid viscosity and increased pressures in the roof system. Excessive heat probably less an issue other the electric pump motor and possibly pump seals. Moral - retractable tops are meant for operation in reasonably nice weather.....>:)
 

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Ex SoCal Nut
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Penny.... You'd Probably Not drop the Top in the near future up there, so, no harm.... as long as you leave it where it is until Spring Weather comes around. If you are driving it daily, that is another story. At 40F, I would drop and use seat and cabin heat for about 15 miles, that's all!
To answer your ?, it depends on the material your seals are.... eg: neoprene, viton, silicone, etc. They All have their own operating temps. EveryThing Hates the Extreme Cold !!! You'll be just Fine by using good judgment by what the temp is each day. Just don't over-drive your tires in the cold and... Be Safe out there...
 

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If something fails you are unhappy until it's fixed.
If you worry about something that might fail, you are unhappy from now till it fails and is fixed.
Stop worrying and drive the damn thing. You'll be much happier.
 
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