Chevy SSR Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking for a reason that GM limits the towing load to 2500lbs on the SSR, question is WHY?.... I've heard it said that the SSR will not handle the extra temperature load put on the engine, Also that the frame will not hold up to a heavy tow, can anyone answer the question?
The SSR IS a truck, and it weighs somewhat about the same as my 04 Silverado LS ext cab, so weight of the towing vehicle can't be the reason, If it is a heat up problem then a larger more efficient radiator and trans cooler should do the trick.
It CAN'T be lack of power.
I have a radical custom 49 chevy chop top coupe that I would love to take to shows on a trailer ..Behind an SSR, that would mean I would have to be able to tow around 5000lbs Any suggestions?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
cooling capacity

Towing is limited because of the cooling.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,506 Posts
I will be towing close to 5000 lbs on a properly designed hitch exiting through the rear license plate. Too many other projects to get it done this year.

It would be fairly short distances - planning on avoiding long climbs because of the potential heating problem.

The 5.3 engine, transmission and frame are from the Trailblazer XT, which has a 7200 lb towing capacity.

Ray
 

·
West Coast Pit Crew
Joined
·
10,185 Posts
Weakest Link

Flassh said:
I will be towing close to 5000 lbs on a properly designed hitch exiting through the rear license plate. Too many other projects to get it done this year.

It would be fairly short distances - planning on avoiding long climbs because of the potential heating problem.

The 5.3 engine, transmission and frame are from the Trailblazer XT, which has a 7200 lb towing capacity.

Ray
Your only as bad as your weakest link which I see that Flassh(Ray) and lloger(Lloyd) has solved the problem with the SSR"s towing. Fix the hitch and cool the engine & trans and I think you have the badest looking truck that can tow 7200lbs. :thumbs
 

·
Retired GM Program Manager/ Chief SSR Engineer
Joined
·
549 Posts
The trailblazer with an engine driven fan and a larger radiator can tow heavier trailers. With the smaller radiator and electric fan, (caused by the styling) the SSR is not validated to tow more than 2500 lbs. This validation is done relative to towing this amount up a long grade in the desert in the heat of the summer. The hitch is strong enough for heavier loads. Keep these conditions in mind when you are considering towing other weights.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,506 Posts
Freezer

Can you tell us "unofficially" (we won't tell a soul) what weight the stock hitch has been tested to?? ie has it been loaded to break point?

If it could handle 5000 lbs safely (other than cooling concerns) and I used airbags within the rear coils to maintain ride height, can I tow short distances?

I want to use it to take boats to car shows in the immediate area - it would save a lot of reworking at the back end, but I didn't want to attempt it, not knowing if the rather unusual socket system could handle the weight.

Ray
 

·
Retired GM Program Manager/ Chief SSR Engineer
Joined
·
549 Posts
I do not know the physical limits of the hitch. The bar will accept the large size hitch ball. I will try to find out those limits, no guarantee.
 

·
Senior Privileged Member
Joined
·
4,101 Posts
Flassh: I have to tell you, I think this is a very bad idea.

Among other things, if you are involved in an accident in which people are injured or killed, a smart opposing attorney would use the expression "reckless endangerment".

I really urge you to reconsider.

Jim G
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,506 Posts
What is the bad idea???

The engine, transmission and frame can handle a 7200 load. If the factory hitch can't handle 5000 lbs, I won't use it. I'll install a proper class 3 receiver, and install airbags.

What possible issue could there be if all the equipment is certified for specific duty? The only question mark is whether the contraption that GM marketed with the SSR can handle the weight - I've never used it because so far I haven't been able to get that information - hopefully Freezer can help

I tow 5000 lbs with my Sonoma with no problem. The truck is lowered, and has airbags at the rear to maintain ride height. We did the same on that truck - installed a class 3 receiver designed for the truck, and modified it to raise it to go through the license plate frame.

The interesting thing is that GM rated my 4 x 4 Sonoma for 5500 lbs. A Chevy Xtreme, with the same engine, transmission and frame gets a "0" rating. Does that mean it can't tow?????

I've towed at least 20000 miles/year for the last 20 years, and so far I only have one burned bearing to report - don't think the lawyers are going to worry me a whole bunch.

Ray
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
:thumbs I just redid mine and used a reworked class three hitch , we reworked it to come out right in the middle of the number plate I also used magnetic strips on the number plate so when it's in use I put the number plate on the tailgate to keep the men in blue happy, so far it's work great can't wait to try it with my new car trailer that's do to arrive next week goodluck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,506 Posts
Johnny,

What hitch system did you use as a donor? Any info and photos would be appreciated.

I haven't had a chance to check a Trailblazer to see if the receiver can be fitted under the SSR, and the alternative was to plasma cut the factory hitch receiver off the crossmember, and weld a standard receiver design to it.

Have you added airbags to the rear springs?

Ray
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I had a class three hitch from a Crown Vic I cut off the mounting brackets and fabricated my own from 4" x 1/4" angle, mounted the angle iron under the chassis trimed it to the width of frame about 3" cut down the over all width of the hitch to around 2" longer than the width of the chassis around 45" if my memory is right I inverted the hitch which brings the reciever exactly in the middle of the number plate marked the angle iron and cut a square hole in each brkt. so it could be slid over the tube on the hitch, after sliding the angle iron over each side I bolted it back up to chassis and welded it to angle iron brkts :thumbs in place , it looks as good as factory and works great I'll post some pictures when the rain stops
 

·
Retired GM Program Manager/ Chief SSR Engineer
Joined
·
549 Posts
The rear crossmember from a Trailblazer will bolt on the SSR as a direct replacement of the hitch bar. I do not know if it aligns with the license plate. If you measured the relationship of the hitch receptacle on a Trailblazer to the frame and compared you could figure this out. I would start with this hardware if it aligns rather than a complete fabrication.
 

·
Retired GM Program Manager/ Chief SSR Engineer
Joined
·
549 Posts
Based on my connections:

The SSR hitch is rated as a Class #2 ,2,000lbs.not to exceed 3500lbs. .However , ORIS uses the same components on other vehicles as a Class #3 ,3,500 lbs. not to exceed 5,000 lbs..... Does that answer your question?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
What the Hack are you'all Talking About?

I'am sorry but I'am one of the dumb one's when it comes to upsidedown hitches and welding on crossmembers and angel iron. ONE ANSWER WOULD DO ME GOOD. How much Hitch weight can the 05 SSR handel. What Trans oil cooler should I buy. I'am going to buy a 21ft ADIRONDACK travel trailer that weigh's 3956 lb's and has a Hitch weight of275 lbs. I really need the facts, the real numbers, no just , you are betteroff not doing it, or go ahead you are ok pulling that load. I will make the mod's if I have to. Is there anyone brave enough to state the max Hitch weight tow rate. Not the Factory CHEVY numbers in the book. :banghead
 

·
Senior Privileged Member
Joined
·
4,101 Posts
Bad Asphalt: Since the SSR is rated by Chevrolet itself to tow 2500 lb, and since the accepted tongue weight range for a 2500 lb trailer is 10% to 15% of the 2500 lb, I think we can safely conclude that the SSR will withstand at LEAST 375 lb of tongue weight, so you look good there.

HOWEVER, you say that the weight of the trailer is quoted as 3956 lb, but the tongue weight is only 275 lb., which is only about 7% of the trailer weight. That is pretty low, and could at least theoretically result in a tail wag under certain cinditions that could escalate into a loss of control.

Another concern I would have is that from my RVing days, I know that manufacturers play some very dangerous games when quoting RV trailer weights. They basically quote the most optimistically low weight that they can get by deleting ALL options, and by assuming NO personal possessions within the trailer. That is of course a preposterous assumption, since most people take along a fair bit of stuff that totals to a surprising amount of weight, and most people DO have optional equipment. I would want to see that trailer weighed on a truck stop scale before I bought it, even if I had to pay for the trip to the scale and the scale charge (usually VERY low).

I say this because before I bought my diesel motorcoach, I studied the actual weights and GVWRs on a number of coaches, and found that with many, the allowable weight for gear AND people was as low as 600 lb!! you have been warned.

The transmission cooler is a great step in the right direction to attack the REAL problem: cooling. I appluad that move!

The remaining problem is colling the engine adequately, especially since most people who go camping with an RV don't do it on a prairie, but rather in hilly or even mountainous terrain. Our SSRs were blessed with very small radiators in the interests of really good looks. I'm not sure ow you go about improving the engine's cooling ability, especially on longer hills.

Jim G
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top