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USN Retired
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Discussion Starter #1
Was out driving in my 05 and sudden my brake petal went soft!!!... SO drove home, parked it and started work on it this morning. Was amazed at what I found....right front caliper seized. Did not pull to the right or anything. So I flushed the brake fluid, replaced the front calipers, turned the discs, replaced the brake shoes, and its wonderful....I wonder how long it had been dragging??

Anyone had that happen?
 

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Premium Member
2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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993 Posts
I had one dragging, not pulling but the front rotors were cupped. Flushed system, replaced front lines with stainless, shiny new red calipers, slotted and drilled rotors. Pedal is far firmer, looks cool and stops short.
 

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19,627 Posts
People don't forget to have your brake fluid changed out and power bled . If your brake fluid looks black it's over due I'm sure. Doing mine very soon
 

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Premium Member
2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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993 Posts
People don't forget to have your brake fluid changed out and power bled . If your brake fluid looks black it's over due I'm sure. Doing mine very soon
Agreed on fluid.

Used a power bleeder with limited success. YMMV.

Did better, doing it old school. Very roughly: Turkey baster removal of old fluid from master. Refill with new. Gatorade bottle (or similar), partially filled with fluid, small hole in lid, with hose from the bleed screw thru lid and with hose below the fluid line. Crack the bleed screw, pump the brakes, check and refill the master cylinder fluid level as you pump out the old fluid. Start from right rear, left rear, right front and left front.

Scrap stuff vs. ~$40 for the power bleeder.

Lots of YouTube videos showing the operation.
 

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DFW TX Crew
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1,435 Posts
I have always thought my breaks felt very soft. Maybe I should look into that....


Josh
 

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454 Posts
Was out driving in my 05 and sudden my brake petal went soft!!!... SO drove home, parked it and started work on it this morning. Was amazed at what I found....right front caliper seized. Did not pull to the right or anything. So I flushed the brake fluid, replaced the front calipers, turned the discs, replaced the brake shoes, and its wonderful....I wonder how long it had been dragging??

Anyone had that happen?
I feel your pain... We were lucky, had Old Yella on a lift for tire balance, noticed right front did not want to spin like the rest. Not a bad idea to raise them up and give them a spin once in awhile..
:yellow: :cry
 

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SSR Pit Crew
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12,537 Posts
I use and it was recommended to use BRAKESTRIP COPPER Test Strips to check Brake Fluid for copper content.

Not sure this is what contributes to caliper problem or not but I did have high copper and changed my fluid.

I changed brake hoses to stainless with almost twice the inside diameter of the OEM brake hoses.

Gave me much "harder" pedal also.

Dicktator

5. Stainless Hose diameter on left is almost twice of OEM hose on right.
 

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DFW TX Crew
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1,435 Posts
I use and it was recommended to use BRAKESTRIP COPPER Test Strips to check Brake Fluid for copper content.

Not sure this is what contributes to caliper problem or not but I did have high copper and changed my fluid.

I changed brake hoses to stainless with almost twice the inside diameter of the OEM brake hoses.

Gave me much "harder" pedal also.

Dicktator

5. Stainless Hose diameter on left is almost twice of OEM hose on right.

Dicktator, in that last picture, is the hose on the left (with red around it) the OEM hose? and the one on the right the new SS hose? Looks like the one on the left opening is much larger then the one on the right while the actually outer diameter is larger the inner tube that flows the juice is not.

Which is better for brakes?


Josh
 

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2,107 Posts
Dicktator, in that last picture, is the hose on the left (with red around it) the OEM hose? and the one on the right the new SS hose? Looks like the one on the left opening is much larger then the one on the right while the actually outer diameter is larger the inner tube that flows the juice is not.

Which is better for brakes?


Josh
:frown2:
You two are just about on the verge of kicking off a debate on fluid dynamics and/or hydraulic pressure, etc. Doing some quick reading, it seems as though a larger (inside diameter) would be a negative factor and not a positive factor regarding brakes. The piston in the MC, will move a certain volume of fluid thru the line regardless of line diameter.

Think about a lazy river. The flow of the river in most areas is say.......4mph. But, when the channel gets narrower, the (same volume) of water will pass thru, but it will move through faster.:|

Commentary I just read suggests that GM for years, used 3/16 lines on the front (disc) brakes and 1/4 lines on the rear (drum) brakes to ease the potential for rear wheel lockups.

Let the debate begin...............:grin2:
 

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SSR Pit Crew
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12,537 Posts
Dicktator, in that last picture, is the hose on the left (with red around it) the OEM hose? and the one on the right the new SS hose? Looks like the one on the left opening is much larger then the one on the right while the actually outer diameter is larger the inner tube that flows the juice is not.

Which is better for brakes?


Josh
Josh, Which part of Stainless on LEFT is larger than OEM on RIGHT? Stainless is RED. Walter from NJ and I had them made at the same time.

Brake fluid as far as I know does not move in lines, pedal puts pressure on oil. I said I don't know much about brakes but pedal felt harder with larger diameter hoses.

Dicktator
 

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DFW TX Crew
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1,435 Posts
Josh, Which part of Stainless on LEFT is larger than OEM on RIGHT? Stainless is RED. Walter from NJ and I had them made at the same time.

Brake fluid as far as I know does not move in lines, pedal puts pressure on oil. I said I don't know much about brakes but pedal felt harder with larger diameter hoses.

Dicktator
Ok, so that last picture the tube on the left (larger inner opening) is the SS new tube and the right is the OEM. I thought they were opposite that's why I was asking.

Thanks for the clarity, I'm needing to do this as my brake pedal is super soft and worries me at times....


Josh
 

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Yes this did just happen to me, both of my front calipers were not letting the front wheels spin as they should. I took the drivers side off first and even tried to close the pistons with a pair of "C" clamp plyers and I could not make them go in at all!! The passenger side was the same so I changed both of them out. I wonder if I should check the rear ones? hummmmm
 

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Premium Member
2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
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993 Posts
All kinds of theorems and calculations...
Here’s my opinion... and I could be wrong (please don’t flame me... but happy to hear contrasting opinions).

Master cylinder is designed to push a certain amount of fluid per stroke.
Calipers are designed to operate a certain pressure.

Increase in diameter does dissipate some energy that could go to the caliper. That said, we aren’t much of a change in diameter for that long of a distance for the flex lines.

The volume the master cylinder moves isn’t going to change with larger lines.

IMO, the firmer pedal comes from tubing that is more resistant to pressure changes, and likely due to getting the contaminants and subsequent air out of the system. Fresh brake fluid, without contaminants and air, should be less compressible.

FWIW: I flushed a lot of air and dark gunky fluid from my system, and the reservoir didn’t look that bad.
 

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Premium Member
2006 S/C Silver & 2006 Pac Blue 6spd
Joined
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993 Posts
Yes this did just happen to me, both of my front calipers were not letting the front wheels spin as they should. I took the drivers side off first and even tried to close the pistons with a pair of "C" clamp plyers and I could not make them go in at all!! The passenger side was the same so I changed both of them out. I wonder if I should check the rear ones? hummmmm
FWIW: I had one front sticking, both fronts rotors were cupped. The rears calipers were OK, but I swapped them all for shiny red ones from Powerstop. I’d check them all.

Do it right once and be done.
Right = Whatever It Takes.

Not saying replacing is “the thing to do”, do “Whatever It Takes” to make it right and not wonder “Should I ____?”
 

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Premium Member
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256 Posts
Agree

All kinds of theorems and calculations...
Here’s my opinion... and I could be wrong (please don’t flame me... but happy to hear contrasting opinions).

Master cylinder is designed to push a certain amount of fluid per stroke.
Calipers are designed to operate a certain pressure.

Increase in diameter does dissipate some energy that could go to the caliper. That said, we aren’t much of a change in diameter for that long of a distance for the flex lines.

The volume the master cylinder moves isn’t going to change with larger lines.

IMO, the firmer pedal comes from tubing that is more resistant to pressure changes, and likely due to getting the contaminants and subsequent air out of the system. Fresh brake fluid, without contaminants and air, should be less compressible.

FWIW: I flushed a lot of air and dark gunky fluid from my system, and the reservoir didn’t look that bad.
In your opinion of the stn stl hose being more resistant to pressure changes is correct IMO also. From my experience of replacing probably 20 or 30 OEM Harley cables with stn stl, the cables just do not expand with increased pressure and the hard pedal feeling is immediate. The OEM cables are mushy compared to stn stl. I believe if you could measure it, the calipers would probably be closing faster.
 
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