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TOP 10 REASONS HURRICANE SEASON IS LIKE CHRISTMAS

10. Decorating the house (boarding up windows)

9. Dragging out boxes that haven't been used since last season (camping gear, flashlights)

8. Last minute shopping in crowded stores

7. Regular TV shows pre-empted for "specials"

6. Family coming to stay with you

5. Family and friends from out of state calling

4. Buying food you don't normally buy... and in large quantities

3. Days off from work

2. Candles

And the number one reason Hurricane Season is like Christmas....

At some point you know you're going to have a tree in your house!
 

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humor

wildcat66 said:
I might think that is funny but I am sure that the people going through it don't right now. I wonder how 17 out of 25 is doing down in water logged Fla.?
Having been through more than my share of them - you got to have a sense of humor about it. Last night on the news they showed a boarded up bar on Bourbon Street - hand painted on it was "we don't run from hurricanes, we drink them"

Luckily Florida is going to miss most of this one. Talked to a guy this afternoon - took him 14 + hours to drive from New Orleans to Houston yesterday - 5 of those was just getting out of New Orleans.

Check out this awesome picture - High def
http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2004/images/ivan091504-1845z.jpg
 

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As a Floridian, I almost posted that list yesterday, but got sidetracked. I laughed when I read it. Most people around here are leaving their windows boarded up until things calm down. We will probably be taking them down and putting up Christmas decorations at the same time. Tropical storm Jeanne is aiming for us now. Hopefully it will turn north before hitting us and the lucky folks in the Carolina's and further north can enjoy all this fun we are going through.
Luckily we came through with only minor damage, a couple of roof shingles and 1 downed tree. Areas in the central part of the state are still under water and the rivers and lakes are still rising.
One thing that is interesting is the mental state of everyone in the state. We are all wound up. Tension levels are high and total mental exhaustion is common.
After seeing some of the damage Frances did firsthand I really feel for the people in the panhandle and Alabama where Ivan is hitting. We were all thankful it didn't hit us but nobody wants to see the destruction this one will cause. Hopefully all will be safe.
 
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Received this email this morning written by Dave Barry originally published in the Miami Herald


GETTING READY FOR HURRICANE IVAN!

Any day now, you're going to turn on the TV and see a weather person pointing to some radar blob out in the Atlantic Ocean and making two basic meteorological points (1) There is no need to panic.(2) We could all be killed. Yes, hurricane season is an exciting time to be in Florida. If you're new to the area, you're probably wondering what you need to do to prepare for the possibility that we'll get hit by "the big one." Based on our experiences, we recommend that you follow this simple three-step hurricane preparedness plan:

STEP 1. Buy enough food and bottled water to last your family for at least three days

STEP 2.Put these supplies into your car.

STEP 3. Drive to Nebraska and remain there until Halloween. Unfortunately, statistics show that most people will not follow this sensible plan. Most people will foolishly stay here in Florida. We'll start with one of the most important hurricane preparedness items:

HOMEOWNERS' INSURANCE: If you own a home, you must have hurricane insurance. Fortunately, this insurance is cheap and easy to get, as long as your home meets two basic requirements (1) It is reasonably well-built, and(2) It is located in Nebraska. Unfortunately, if your home is located in Florida, or any other area that might actually be hit by a hurricane, most insurance companies would prefer not to sell you hurricane insurance, because then they might be required to pay YOU money, and that is certainly not why they got into the insurance business in the first place. So you'll have to scrounge around for an insurance company, which will charge you an annual premium roughly equal to the replacement value of your house. At any moment, this company can drop you like used dental floss. Since Hurricane Georges, I have had an estimated 27 different home-insurance companies. This week, I'm covered by the Bob and Big Stan Insurance Company, under a policy which states that, in addition to my premium, Bob and Big Stan are entitled, on demand, to my kidneys.

SHUTTERS: Your house should have hurricane shutters on all the windows, all the doors, and -- if it's a major hurricane -- all the toilets. There are several types of shutters, with advantages and disadvantages: Plywood shutters: The advantage is that, because you make them yourself, they're cheap. The disadvantage is that, because you make them yourself, they will fall off. Sheet-metal shutters: The advantage is that these work well, once you get them all up. The disadvantage is that once you get them all up, your hands will be useless bleeding stumps, and it will be December. Roll-down shutters: The advantages are that they're very easy to use, and will definitely protect your house. The disadvantage is that you will have to sell your house to pay for them. Hurricane-proof windows: These are the newest wrinkle in hurricane protection: They look like ordinary windows, but they can withstand hurricane winds! You can be sure of this, because the salesman says so. He lives in Nebraska.
Hurricane Proofing Your Property: As the hurricane approaches, check your yard for movable objects like barbecue grills, planters, patio furniture, visiting relatives, etc.. You should, as a precaution, throw these items into your swimming pool (if you don't have a swimming pool, you should have one built immediately). Otherwise, the hurricane winds will turn these objects into deadly missiles.

EVACUATION ROUTE: If you live in a low-lying area, you should have an evacuation route planned out. (To determine whether you live in a low-lying area, look at your driver's license; if it says "Florida," you live in a low-lying area). The purpose of having an evacuation route is to avoid being trapped in your home when a major storm hits. Instead, you will be trapped in a gigantic traffic jam several miles from your home, along with two hundred thousand other evacuees. So, as a bonus, you will not be lonely.

HURRICANE SUPPLIES: If you don't evacuate, you will need a mess of supplies. Do not buy them now! Florida tradition requires that you wait until the last possible minute, then go to the supermarket and get into vicious fights with strangers over who gets the last can of SPAM. In addition to food and water, you will need the following supplies: *23 flashlights At least $167 worth of batteries that turn out, when the power goes off, to be the wrong size for the flashlights. *Bleach. (No, I don't know what the bleach is for. NOBODY knows what the bleach is for, but it's traditional, so GET some!) A 55-gallon drum of underarm deodorant. *A big knife that you can strap to your leg. (This will be useless in a hurricane, but it looks cool.) *A large quantity of raw chicken, to placate the alligators. (Ask anybody who went through Camille; after the hurricane, there WILL be irate alligators.) *$35,000 in cash or diamonds so that, after the hurricane passes, you can buy a generator from a man with no discernible teeth. Of course these are just basic precautions. As the hurricane draws near, it is vitally important that you keep abreast of the situation by turning on your television and watching TV reporters in rain slickers stand right next to the ocean and tell you over and over how vitally important it is for everybody to stay away from the ocean.Good luck, and remember:

It's great living in Paradise!!!
 

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Dragon, I just busted a gut reading that!! Too funny. You might want to get some new boots bro, this thing is gonna dump a lot of rain on us later (the western part of Va. and West Va.). THis is one time I am glad I live at the beach, but then, we don't know what other crazy storms are going to do. THis is the most "Cane Crazy" year I have seen on the East Coast.
 

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'Cane Crazy

I'll agree with "'Cane Crazy" -- we've been evacuating and re-manning offshore rigs seems like for months now. this morning the auto-GPS systems on board indicated we had two rigs floating loose in the Eastern Gulf - one was 17 miles away from original location - no big deal - just about a $300 million replacement price - each - and who knows what it might hit. Got people on both now by chopper and the one that is self-propelled is on it's way back to location - the other one's waiting on the tow vessel. Was an anxious morning here until we had confirmation from the fixed wing. Still - no people on during the storm - so just had iron to lose.
 
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