Chevy SSR Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yellow costs more because it requires an extra step in the paint process.

Is that extra step an under coat of white? I've said before I wanted a white SSR.
 

·
I DO WINDOWS
Joined
·
8,830 Posts
...

I don't know… usually to buy paint, Red cost more because of the cost of the pigment used to make red. Yellow is a harder color to get coverage with, you can see threw it easier. In art work we often use a white base before the yellow. I do not know if factory works this way or not. I can’t see why it should be a higher cost paint job. The two tones will be a premium I bet.
 

·
Retired GM Program Manager/ Chief SSR Engineer
Joined
·
549 Posts
Yellow paint costs more because it costs more in liquid form. There are no more process steps in production.
 

·
SSR Pit Crew
Joined
·
1,742 Posts
freezer said:
Yellow paint costs more because it costs more in liquid form. There are no more process steps in production.
Freezer,

As always, precise and to the point answers....

Thank you for being there..........
 

·
SSR Owners Group
Joined
·
3,753 Posts
freezer said:
Yellow paint costs more because it costs more in liquid form. There are no more process steps in production.

AND - due to the STEALTH LIKE radar absorption qualities... :jester
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
The cost of yellow paint has skyrocketed because the paint companies are reformulating the toners to LEAD FREE. This also includes the orange and red. The absence of lead/reformulation is another reason for poor hiding and many paint manufacturers: Valspar/Debeer, PPG, Dupount, etc. will give recommendations as to the undercoat.

For the Slingshot Yellow it is a white base is suggested for the best color match and hiding. If you're doing a repair a yellow tinted tinted primer will help with the blending and hiding.

The further you move away from a white undercoat, such as gray or black(aftermarket parts) the Slingshot Yellow will take on a green hue. Take a look at the next Millenium Yellow 'vette you see on the road that has the front license plate delete. Most shops will just shot the yellow over the black plastic and call it good and then the customer comes back for a redo.

My suggestion is to shop around at different paint jobbers and do some sprayouts. There is a very large price difference from one paint manufacturer to another. Lower price will not always mean a lower quality paint.


kroozn
 

·
I DO WINDOWS
Joined
·
8,830 Posts
...

Thanks freezer and Kroozn, that all sounds realistic to me. (I just bought PPG 1 pint 79u yellow $32can.) Kroozn Have you heard about oneshot not wanting to stick to 2005 and up ford and gm factory paint. I know one shot has lead removed since last year and some before that. But guys think the new factory auto paint is changed with something added. One shot is not sticking. :mad
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Pinstriping and lettering paint

Rebel,
First I need to ask the application of the one shot paint. If you want the stripping or lettering to last step up to the House of Kolor Striping/Lettering Urethane. You will end up with a far superior finished product.

The HOK will lay flatter and lock in better to the substrate and also accepts the clearcoat.

HOK striping tips: If clearcoating over the striping urethane use a small amount of catalyst and this will lock the stripes in and keep them from shifting. Your lines will lay very flat so less clear is needed.

If you're not going to clear over the stripes or a factory finish:

--Clean the surface with wax/grease remover(HOK KC10) and wipe dry.
--Clean a second time with a waterbased cleaner(HOK KC 20).
--Choose your color, catalyze it(HOK U00) and lay your stripes.

Just remember when you're striping with the catalyzed HOK, once it's on the surface it's very difficult to remove mistakes.

Sounds like I've avoided the whole question of one shot not sticking to the new paints because of the new chemistry. Basically that is true. Enamels will lock in good with other enamels but not the catalyzed urethanes. Once the chemical structure of the catalyzed urethanes link up, they only way for following paint to properly stick is by mechanical adhesion. That is why one shot doesn't stick well or last on factory finishes.


............from the dark side of the painting blvd,
kroozn
 

·
I DO WINDOWS
Joined
·
8,830 Posts
...

I have a couple HOK stripeing colors... but as you said, once it's down it bites. I'm just learning to stripe so I will play with the One shot for now. I know some guys are just useing basecoat to stripe with. You sounded like your in the know so I thought I would ask about new developments with factory paint. I do cruise a /art , a /graphics, and Pinstriper boards, so I know all you have just posted is true. Thanks REBEL / Ed :thumbs ... I was over to Iowa to see J. HETZLER for a stripeing class last fall, man it’s harder to learn than the airbrushing was. Keep it wet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Most of my customers agree that one shot is easier to lay down since it's enamel and stays wet longer. They also are finding some success with newer basecoats, but stick to the premium lines, absolutely no econo basecoats since the majority of that paint is just clear base. Most premium/European style basecoats use prebalanced toners and liquid pearls, so you can use the toner right of the bank and reduce.

sounds like you're doing your research..... :thumbs ....look forward to seeing your work :flag ,

as always.................................kroozn the blvd
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top